Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Unit Porfolio | Abc Paper
+1(978)310-4246 credencewriters@gmail.com
  

Please see instructions and example.

EDUC 637

Unit Portfolio Assignment Instructions

Overview

You are to produce a unit of instruction. This unit will contain elements as listed below, but must be presented in Microsoft PowerPoint or an equivalent. There is to be a maximum of 20 slides. The intent is for you, the candidate, to see the big picture for instructional design with regard to a specific topic.

Instructions

The following elements must be present in the Unit Portfolio:

· Title page with your name, course and section number, date of submission, and title of unit.
· Subsequent slides include the following:
· Section 1
· The subject of the overall unit

· Grade/topic

· State and national standards addressed by the unit

· A listing of the general goals
· Section 2
· The specific character principles (and where these principles will be focused on)
· Section 3

· A review of the specific learning objectives covered by the entire unit

· A listing of the key critical concepts being addressed in the unit

· Section 4

· The unit map showing the main unit theme and the lessons related to the central theme and to each other.

· The unit schedule: A description of the Unit Duration (not actual dates but rather a schedule of days)

· The course map: The context of that unit (a course map of all units for that grade/ subject combination and a demonstration of where that unit is) as related to the overall course.
· Section 5

· An overview of the learning activities to be included in the unit (including the lessons that have been detailed).

· A list of all resources and materials to be used (and which lessons these resources will be used for).
· Section 6
· A description of the classroom diversity and differentiation (can be identical to the lesson plans) and how these are being considered. This must include both cultural and learning diversification.
· Section 7
· The diagnostic assessment tool employed at the beginning of the unit.
· The formative assessments interspersed appropriately among the lessons.
· Section 8
· A description of the diagnostic, formative and summative assessments.
· Section 9
· A description of how this unit considers curricular connections.

Terms and Expectations Explained

The following elements are some guiding notes to help clarify the above sections:

· Subject: The subject of this unit will be chosen by the candidate.
· Key Critical Concepts: The concepts should arise and permeate throughout the unit (like democracy, freedom, and environmental influence). These should be explored through the unit and instruction.

· Launching Activity: This should be an attention-grabbing activity. The best of these are those that help to see the real-life relevancy of the lesson/ unit.

· Assessments: The unit should have a diagnostic assessment (for the beginning of the unit), formative assessments (formal or informal) and a summative assessment. These do not have to be classical paper-pencil but can be. Be creative AND appropriate.

· Course Map and Unit Map: The maps both demonstrate context (where the unit lies in a course and where the lessons lie in the unit). This forces collaborators to know where you are going and what is necessary before exploring particular topics.

· Unit Schedule: This schedule should give day counts, not a specific schedule (i.e. not attached to dates). It is best to show this in a table with topics of instruction, unique activities, and assessments.

· Resource Expectations: You should use a mixture of resources, including: technology where appropriate and possible, texts and hands-on activities.

· Lessons: The lessons should be connected by the unit and should build towards the accomplishment of the actual unit.
Submit this assignment in Canvas
and
LiveText.

LiveText Submission Exception: Candidates pursuing the following programs: M.Ed. in Higher Education, Ed.S. in Higher Education Administration, and the Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration, are not required to submit this assignment in LiveText, but must submit this assignment in Canvas.

Page 2 of 2

The Great Depression and World War II
(A Unit Plan for Grade 6 History and Geography)

July 3, 2020

Submitted by:
XXXXXXXXXX

Unit Description/Texas Standards
The unit covers Era 8, The Great Depression and World War II

The unit is for a Grade 5 history

Texas Education Agency Standard (§113.16. Social Studies, Grade 5)
The student understands important issues, events, and individuals in the United States during the 20th and 21st centuries. The student is expected to:
(A)  analyze various issues and events of the 20th century such as industrialization, urbanization, increased use of oil and gas, the Great Depression, the world wars, the civil rights movement, and military actions;
(B)  analyze various issues and events of the 21st century such as the War on Terror and the 2008 presidential election; and
(C)  identify the accomplishments of individuals and groups such as Jane Addams, Susan B. Anthony, Dwight Eisenhower, Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, Cesar Chavez, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Ronald Reagan, Colin Powell, the Tuskegee Airmen, and the 442nd Regimental Combat Team who have made contributions to society in the areas of civil rights, women’s rights, military actions, and politics.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter113/ch113a.html

National Standards from The National Center for History in the Schools, UCLA
Standard 1 The causes of the Great Depression and how it affected American society. 

Standard 1A The student understands the causes of the crash of 1929 and the Great Depression. 
5-12 Analyze the causes and consequences of the stock market crash of 1929. [Compare competing historical narratives]
5-12 Evaluate the causes of the Great Depression. [Analyze multiple causation]

Standard 1B The student understands how American life changed during the 1930s.
5-12 Explain the effects of the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl on American farm owners, tenants, and sharecroppers. [Analyze multiple causation]

Standard 2 How the New Deal addressed the Great Depression, transformed American federalism, and initiated the welfare state

Standard 2A The student understands the New Deal and the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt.
5-12 Contrast the background and leadership abilities of Franklin D. Roosevelt with those of Herbert Hoover. [Assess the importance of the individual in history] (Cause and-effect relationships]

Standard 2B The student understands the impact of the New Deal on workers and the labor movement.
5-12 Explain how New Deal legislation and policies affected American workers and the labor movement. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]

Standard 2C The student understands opposition to the New Deal, the alternative programs of its detractors, and the legacy of the New Deal.
5-12 Evaluate the significance and legacy of the New Deal. [Evaluate the implementation of a decision]

Standard 3 The causes and course of World War II, the character of the war at home and abroad, and its reshaping of the U.S. role in world affairs. 

Standard 3A The student understands the international background of World War II.
5-12 Explain the major turning points of the war and contrast military campaigns in the European and Pacific theaters. [Draw upon data in historical maps]
5-12 Explain how the United States mobilized its economic and military resources during World War II. [Utilize visual and quantitative data]

http://www.nchs.ucla.edu/Standards/us-history-content-standards/us-era-8

Character Integration Principles
Debt—Excess debt is a danger for individuals , companies, or nations. Prior to the great depression, people and businesses had an unbiblical perspective on debt and credit. The consequences during the depression were severe and painful. “The rich rule over the poor, and the borrower is slave to the lender. Proverbs 22:7 (NIV).”

Contentment—Even if a person lacks the basics and still has needs, a person can find contentment, peace, and strength, through God. “I know what it is to be in need, and I know what it is to have plenty. I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want. 13 I can do all this through him (Christ) who gives me strength.” Philippians 4:12-13 (NIV).”

Justice—Sometimes a person or a nation has to fight to defend the weak and exploited; stand for what is right; and promote justice in the world. standing for the exploited and weak

Unit Objectives
TSW
Analyze the causes and consequences of the stock market crash of 1929.
List and explain the causes of the Great Depression
Identify names, dates, and terms specific to the Great Depression
Compare the causes of the Great Depression to current conditions in America today.
Demonstrate how excessive debt contributed to economic failure

TSW
Interpret maps to explain how American life changed during the 1930s for rural farm owners and urban laborers.
Explore how the New Deal addressed the Great Depression, transformed American federalism, and initiated the welfare state

TSW
Write a biographical character sketches comparing Franklin D. Roosevelt and Herbert Hoover.
Contrast the background and leadership abilities of Franklin D. Roosevelt with those of Herbert Hoover.
Identify and evaluate programs implemented as part of the New Deal
Explain how New Deal legislation and policies affected American workers and the labor movement.

TSW
Identify the causes and course of World War II,
Demonstrate how Totalitarianism can rise and take advantage of democracies
Explore the character of the war at home and abroad, how America’s involvement in WWII has reshaped the U.S. role in world affairs. 

TSW
Identify and explain the major turning points of the war (Midway, Battle of Bulge)
Identify the major personalities and battles of the and contrast military campaigns in the European theater.
Identify the major personalities and battles of the and contrast military campaigns in the Pacific theater.
Explain how the United States mobilized its economic and military resources during World War II.
Take a position on the use of Atomic Weapons

Key Concepts
Excessive Debt and Desire for Easy Wealth Lead to Problems for Individuals, Companies, and Nations

Government has a role to play in tough times

A balance is necessary between the rights of workers and the needs of companies

The Society of today is a result of Franklin Roosevelt’s actions as President

Almost all wars are fought over resources (land, oil, water, people)

Totalitarianism is a threat to the American way of life

Fighting is necessary to promote justice in other parts of the world

Fighting is necessary to preserve America’s way of life

Unit Map for The Great Depression and World War II

Great Depression
And New Deal

Stock Market Crash

Life in the Great Depression

The New Deal

WWII

The Road to War

The European Campaign

The Pacific Campaign

Causes

Dust Bowl

Work Programs

American Neutrality

European Appeasement

The Rise of Totalitarianism

Totalitarian Expansionism

Blitzkrieg

War on Two Fronts

Italian Liberation

D-Day

Japanese Imperialism/ Expansion

Pearl Harbor

American Victory in the Pacific

America After WWII

Effects on America and the world

Labor rights

Social Programs

Political Excesses

Unit Schedule

Sub-Units Lessons Lessons Lessons Lessons

Great Depression (4 Days) Stock Market Crash (2 day) Dust Bowl
(1 day) Labor Struggles (1 day)

New Deal
(5 Days) Work Programs (2 days) Social Programs
(2 days)

WWII (12 Days)
Road to War
(4 days) European Campaign
(4 Days) Pacific Campaign
(4 Days) Post-war America (1 Day)

Unit Assessment
2 Days Review (1 day) Test (1 day)

Course Map for 5th Grade History and Geography

5th Grade History and Geography

2nd 9 weeks

3rd 9 weeks

1st 9 weeks

Exploration

Colonization

Growth of a New Nation

War on Two Fronts

The Civil War

Reconstruction

Gilded Age

Industrialization

Westward Expansion

4th 9 weeks

Revolution

Establishment of the Nation

WWI

Great Depression and WWII

America the Superpower

America Today

Learning Activities
Daily journal entries/reflections that draw on previous days lesson
Simulation that helps students understand Inflation, Stock margin calls
Study biographical information on Hoover/Roosevelt and write character sketches
Simulate labor bids to demonstrate how companies can undercut wages (Pitting workers against each other vs. Unionizing)
Selected students will role play a scenario that visualizes the issue of German expansionism/and appeasement
Debate on should the U.S. stay neutral or fight (based on historical newspaper articles)
Watch and assess videos on Hitler, Mussolini, and Imperial Japan
Simulation/game that allows students to try to recreate/prevent the rise of totalitarianism (Scripted events/reaction/probabilities decided by chance dice rolls etc)
In-class museum—View and discuss authentic and reproduced items from WWII

Resources and Materials
Student Journals
Encyclopedia/Biographies for Character Sketches on Hoover/Roosevelt
Board Game Money to demonstrate economics of Stock Market Crash/Margin Calls/Inflation
YouTube videos/History.com videos on stock market crash and Great Depression (History Channel)
Overhead projector and transparencies for WWII campaigns
WWII Atlases and Map reproductions for WWII campaigns
Wall map (projected for simulation)
DVD Clips
Dawn of War Early Battles of WWII
Battlefront (Profiles on Hitler; Mussolini; Stalin; Japan; Key battles)
Historical Artifacts (for WWII lessons)
Newspapers (Chicago Sun-Times from 1939; Stars & Stripes from 1943-44)
Victory in Europe Experience (Book with recreation of documents)
WWII unit patches; documents; memorabilia

Differentiation
LD, ED, ADD, MR – Use of imagery/maps/videos/simulations/role play/debates will assist those not receptive to text use.
LD Opportunity to present oral reports rather than written character sketches
Gifted– Read “Hitler Youth” and prepare a presentation on life in Germany as a young person.
Learning Styles( Visual auditory and kinetic addressed with visuals, movement in classroom, simulations
Multicultural Connections –
Explore the treatment of Nazi prisoners versus African American soldiers in the 1940s.
Why did America send American citizens of Japanese ethnicity to internment camps? How was this different from German concentration camps?
What was the connection between German eugenics and the Holocaust (i.e. what is the value of people and how easily can we devalue people?)

Assessments
Diagnostic Assessments

Great Depression–Brief quiz to assess knowledge of terms/persons/key events
WWII– Jeopardy-style game that determines scope of knowledge of class

Formative Assessments

Students create a (detailed) timeline of events from 1929- 1939 from memory (given 3 significant events)– ungraded activity.
Students complete map exercises that highlight key players of WWII; and main theaters; highlighting the Axis and Allied alliances
Traditional matching quiz on key leaders/personalities to their countries/alliances
Journal entries that require students to reflect on previous day’s lesson
Character sketches of Roosevelt/Hoover
Role play, debates, and simulations to determine degree to which students are inculcating objectives

Summative Assessments

Section multiple choice/short answer test on Great Depression w/map
Section multiple choice/short answer test on WWII w/map
Unit test using elements from two previous tests

Curricular Connections
Science—eugenics; agricultural principles related to soil erosion/retention

Language—Diary of Anne Frank; book reports

Bible—the morality of war (for Christian school)

EDUC 637

Unit Portfolio Grading Rubric

Criteria

Levels of Achievement

Content

Advanced

Proficient

Developing

Not present

Subject, Grade, and Topic

10 points

Plan subject, topic, and grade are age appropriate.

8 to 9 points

Plan subject and topic are age appropriate, but grade is missing.

1 to 7 points

Plan is age appropriate but is missing either grade or topic.

0 points

Plan is not age appropriate.

State and National Standards

10 points

Reflects National and State standards using InTASC Standards and SOLs.

8 to 9 points

Reflects National and State standards but does not address either the InTASC Standards or SOLs.

1 to 7 points

Reflects National and State standards, but is missing InTASC Standards and SOLs

0 points

No standards are mentioned in the plan.

General Goals

10 points

The plan has identified goals for the unit of instruction that appropriately build toward the identified SOLs/InTASC Standards and subject.

8 to 9 points

The plan has identified goals for the unit of instruction that somewhat build toward the identified SOLs/InTASC Standards and subject.

1 to 7 points

The plan has identified goals for the unit of instruction that somewhat build toward the identified SOLs/InTASC Standards or subject.

0 points

The plan does not identify goals for the unit of instruction.

Specific Objectives

10 points

The plan has an objective with an audience, behavior, criterion, and demonstration of performance.

8 to 9 points

The objectives are measurable
or
it is observable.

1 to 7 points

The objectives are
neither
measurable
nor
observable.

0 points

No objectives are present.

Key Concepts

10 points

The plan identifies key concepts to be covered by the unit that appropriately correspond and build toward both the goals and objectives.

8 to 9 points

The plan identifies key concepts to be covered by the unit and they correspond to either the goals or objectives.

1 to 7 points

The plan identifies key concepts to be covered by the unit but does not correspond to the goals and objectives.

0 points

The plan fails to identify key concepts.

Course Map

11 to 12 points

The plan includes a detailed map of concepts and topics connecting the unit’s central theme to the context of the course.

10 points

The plan includes a map of concepts that connect to the unit’s central theme to the context of the course.

1 to 9 points

The plan includes a map of concepts that partially connect to the unit’s central theme to the context of the course.

0 points

The plan does not effectively connect the central theme to the context of the course.

Unit Map

11 to 12 points

The plan includes a detailed map of concepts and topics as connected to the central theme of the unit.

10 points

The plan includes a map of concepts and topics as connected to the central theme of the unit.

1 to 9 points

The plan includes a map of some concepts and topics as connected to the central theme of the unit.

0 points

The plan does not include a map of concepts and topics connected to the central theme of the unit.

Unit Duration

10 points

The unit schedule is included and details a generic schedule for implementation (no dates, but duration).

8 to 9 points

The unit schedule is included and provides most details for implementation.

1 to 7 points

The unit schedule does not reflect the component of unit durations.

0 points

The unit schedule is not present.

Unit Activating Activities

10 points

Provides a beneficial way to begin the unit that is both creative and engaging. Corresponds to identified goals and objectives.

8 to 9 points

Provides a beneficial way to begin the unit that is both creative and engaging.
Corresponds either identified goals or objectives.

1 to 7 points

Provides an activity to begin the unit that is not creative or engaging. Corresponds either identified goals or objectives.

0 points

No activity to begin the unit if provided.

Learning Activities

11 to 12 points

The plan identifies creative and engaging learning activities that build toward the general goals
and
the specific objectives.

10 points

The plan identifies creative and engaging learning activities that build toward the general goals
or
the specific objectives.

1 to 9 points

The plan identifies learning activities that build toward the general goals or the specific objects, but they are not creative or engaging.

0 points

The plan identifies learning activities that do not build toward the general goals and specific objectives.

Resources and Materials

10 points

Materials, equipment and resources are for hands-on learning.

8 to 9 points

Materials, equipment, and resources listed, but they are not hands-on.

1 to 7 points

Hands-on learning is evident, but materials, equipment, and resources are not listed.

0 points

Materials are not listed and learning is not hands-on.

Diagnostic, Formative and Summative Assessments

11 to 12 points

Provides evaluation techniques for summative, formative, and diagnostics assessments that matches the objective and attaches to tool.

10 points

Provides evaluation techniques for 2 of the following: summative, formative, and diagnostics assessments that matches the objective and attaches to tool.

1 to 9 points

Provides evaluation techniques for 1 of the following: summative, formative, and diagnostics assessments that matches the objective and attaches to tool.

0 points

No evaluation tools are provided.

Curricular Connections

10 points

Identifies bridges to a minimum of 3 other curricular areas so as to highlight multidisciplinary instructional opportunities.

8 to 9 points

Identifies bridges to 2 other curricular areas so as to highlight multidisciplinary instructional opportunities.

1 to 7 points

Identifies bridges to 1 other curricular area so as to highlight multidisciplinary instructional opportunities.

0 points

No cross-curricular connections are made.

Classroom Diversity and Differentiation

10 points

Clearly states classroom diversity. Notes considerations for modalities of learning, gender, exceptional students, and students with special needs.

8 to 9 points

Clearly states classroom diversity. Notes considerations for 2 of the following: modalities of learning, gender, exceptional students, and students with special needs.

1 to 7 points

Clearly states classroom diversity. Notes considerations for 1 of the following: modalities of learning, gender, exceptional students, and students with special needs.

0 points

Does not state classroom diversity considerations.

Character Principle

10 points

Has a character education principle applied to the unit and relates the principle to Scripture.

8 to 9 points

Has a character education principle or guiding Scripture.

1 to 7 points

Has a character education principle or relates a principle to Scripture but is not applied in the lesson.

0 points

No character education principle or scripture is present.

Structure

Advanced

Proficient

Developing

Not present

Sources

21 to 23 points

Citations and references are documented in current APA format with no errors.

19 to 20 points

Citations and references are documented in current APA format with 1–2 style errors.

1 to 18 points

Citations and references are documented in current APA format with 3–4 styles errors.

0 points

Citations and or references are missing. More than 4 style errors.

Assignment Completion

20 to 22 points

All plan required plan components are present.

18 to 19 points

Plan is missing 1–2 required components.

1 to 17 points

Plan is missing 3–4 required components.

0 points

Plan is missing more than 4 required components.

Mechanics

20 to 22 points

No grammar, spelling, or punctuation errors are present.

18 to 19 points

A total of 1–2 grammar, spelling, or punctuation errors are present.

1 to 17 points

A total of 3–4 grammar, spelling, or punctuation errors are present.

0 points

More than 4 grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors are present.

Page 3 of 3

error: Content is protected !!