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Topic: Sweden’s Criminal Justice System
Due: May 4, 2021 by 11:59 a.m.
  
Discussion: Sweden’s Criminal Justice System Assignment Instructions
The student will complete 1 Discussion in this course. The student will post one thread of 800–1200 words by May 4, 2021 by 11:59 a.m. (ET). The student must then post 2 replies of at least 250 words each by 11:59 a.m. (ET) on Friday. For each thread, students must support their assertions with at least 5 scholarly citations in current APA format. Each reply must incorporate at least 1 scholarly citation in current APA format. Any sources cited must have been published within the last five years. Acceptable sources include texts, articles, presentations, the Bible, blogs, videos, etc.
Threads are due by 11:59 a.m. (ET) on May 4, 2021. Replies are due by 11:59 a.m. (ET) on Friday of the same week.
You are a university professor preparing to bring a group of Liberty University students to Sweden as part of your comparative criminal justice systems class.  Although you could get students to do the work, you decide to give a great example of an analysis of the criminal justice system in Sweden.  Prepare an analysis, in the form of a discussion post, of Sweden’s criminal justice system with the below listed items in mind:
The following is an outline of what you should cover in your post and paper:

Focus upon Sweden for the purposes of this discussion.
Begin your discussion with a brief analysis of the following elements:

Country analysis

Introduction to the country, people and society of the country
Economy
Transnational issues (if applicable) that may impact law enforcement
Relations with the United States
What is the basic government structure and its relationship to the criminal justice system
What is the “legal family” or basis of law in the country
What are the major components of the criminal justice system in the country

Please explain the following elements:

Briefly explain the law enforcement system of the country
Briefly explain the judicial process of the country
Briefly explain the corrections process of the country

Provide a brief analysis on:

The effectiveness of the criminal justice system in the country
The human rights perspective of the country

Topic: Sweden’s Criminal Justice System

Due: May 4, 2021 by 11:59 a.m.

Terrill, R. J. (2009). World criminal justice systems: a survey Seventh Edition. Anderson Publishing, Limited.

You are a university professor preparing to bring a group of Liberty University students to Sweden as part of your comparative criminal justice systems class.  Although you could get students to do the work, you decide to give a great example of an analysis of the criminal justice system in Sweden.  Prepare an analysis, in the form of a discussion post, of Sweden’s criminal justice system with the below listed items in mind:
The following is an outline of what you should cover in your post and paper:
· Focus upon Sweden for the purposes of this discussion.
· Begin your discussion with a brief analysis of the following elements:
. Country analysis
1. Introduction to the country, people and society of the country
1. Economy
1. Transnational issues (if applicable) that may impact law enforcement
1. Relations with the United States
1. What is the basic government structure and its relationship to the criminal justice system
1. What is the “legal family” or basis of law in the country
1. What are the major components of the criminal justice system in the country
. Please explain the following elements:
2. Briefly explain the law enforcement system of the country
2. Briefly explain the judicial process of the country
2. Briefly explain the corrections process of the country
. Provide a brief analysis on:
3. The effectiveness of the criminal justice system in the country
3. The human rights perspective of the country

The Original thread is due by 11:59 a.m. (ET).   

Kiruna

Stockholm

Norway

SWEDEN

400 km0

NORWEGIAN
SEA

BALTIC
SEA

Gothenburg

Den.

Poland
Russia

Lithuania

Belarus

Latvia

Estonia Russia

Finland

Malmö

Ger.

Concepts to Know

Riksdag
Offi ce of the Parliamentary

Ombudsman
National Police Board
Law Council
Temporary Custody Act

(1973)
National Council for Crime

Prevention
lay judges
principle of mandatory

prosecution

public victims’ counsel
furloughs
Act on Correctional

Treatment in Institutions
(1974)

day-fi ne
KRUM
social boards
social police

213

Chapter III

SWEDEN

INTRODUCTION
Sweden is a large, elongated country located on the eastern half of

the Scandinavian peninsula. The Baltic Sea separates the country from its
southern neighbors, Germany and Poland. Sweden encompasses an area
of 173,731 square miles, which makes it the fourth largest country in
Europe in terms of area and, by way of comparison, roughly the size of
the state of California. Its population of more than 9 million is small
compared to other European countries. About 90 percent of its inhabit-
ants live in the southern half of the country, with one-third of the popula-
tion living in the three major cities of Stockholm, Götenburg, and Malmö.
The rest of the populace live in fairly small cities. This is largely the result
of the highly decentralized nature of Sweden’s industry.

Sweden was largely an agrarian country until the middle of the nine-
teenth century. Since that time, it has emerged as one of the most indus-
trialized nations in the world. Included among the signifi cant industries
are: iron and steel, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, communications, elec-
tronics, paper, pulp and wood, and transportation equipment. The coun-
try has become so highly industrialized that only 2 percent of the labor
force is now employed in agriculture. The majority of the farms in Sweden
are small, family-owned units. With the possible exception of the United
States, Sweden is the only industrialized country in the world that has the
capacity to be relatively self-suffi cient.

WORLD CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS214

Since World War II, the greatest attention and interest in Sweden has
been directed at two objectives: (1) its ability to achieve a high standard
of living for its people through economic prosperity; and (2) an adherence
to and expansion of its application of social welfare principles. There are
a number of factors that were instrumental in securing the achievement
of this successful merger of capitalism with socialism. The level of indus-
trialization obviously enhanced the process, but there were other equally
signifi cant variables. For example, Sweden’s foreign policy was one of
neutrality in times of both peace and war. Thus, they were free to direct
their attentions and resources to domestic affairs.

While most advanced societies are characterized as having some
regional, linguistic, religious, racial, or ethnic heterogeneous qualities,
only the Scandinavian countries, along with Japan, can claim to be homo-
geneous. The offi cial language spoken is Swedish, and about 80 percent
of the population are at least nominally members of the Lutheran State
Church. Moreover, there have been only two native minority groups of
any signifi cance. The Sami or Lapps number about 17,000 and have lived
in northern Sweden for centuries. In recent years, the Sami have begun
to integrate into the general society as they abandon reindeer herding.
The other minority group are the Finns, who number about 30,000 and
have lived primarily near the Finnish border. The homogenous nature of
the society has enabled the country to operate with an unusual degree
of political and social stability.

A fi nal factor, which was allegedly instrumental in securing a success-
ful economic and social policy, was that government bureaucracy was
decentralized. While the national government is located in Stockholm, it
is largely administered at the provincial and local levels. This led to a
further integration of society rather than a segregation of it.

The successful merger of capitalism with socialism began to experi-
ence some diffi culty by the 1980s. Among the factors that contributed to
these concerns was a reduction in the growth of the economy. There were
also added pressures placed on the government’s welfare budget. The
welfare state had matured both in the sophisticated delivery of its ser-
vices and in the number of people who were eligible for its benefi ts.

This last point is in part attributed to the previous decades of rapid
industrialization, which led to demands for a larger labor force. As a
result, there was an infl ux of immigrants from other Nordic countries
and from the continent of Europe. In more recent years, the country has
experienced an infl ux of immigrants who were also seeking political asy-
lum. These included people from several eastern European countries, as
well as refugees from Chile, Ethiopia, Iran, and Vietnam. In the late
1980s and early 1990s, Sweden began to experience racist incidents that
were unheard of a decade earlier. This led to a good deal of discussion
about restricting the country’s immigration policy. The government initi-
ated a campaign ahead of the 2006 parliamentary elections that was

CHAPTER III • SWEDEN 215

designed to increase participation in Swedish society, especially for those
who had been excluded in the past. While all citizens were targeted,
immigrants, along with people with disabilities, were singled out for par-
ticular attention.

Finally, it should be noted that Sweden became a member of the
European Union (EU) on January 1, 1995. Sweden’s neutral—and at times
isolationist—foreign policy will undoubtedly be altered by this decision.
Upon entering the EU, the country did reserve the right to abstain from
participating in any defense alliances that the EU might establish.

GOVERNMENT
Sweden’s political and legal institutions were largely indigenous cre-

ations that resulted from centuries of isolation from events on the conti-
nent of Europe. Sweden was an active participant in the European power
struggles of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, but in the early
nineteenth century, the country returned to a state of isolationism.
Although its nonallied status in world politics enhanced its insular posi-
tion, it is evident that this is not as pronounced as it once was. Ideas from
France, Germany, England, and the United States have had a signifi cant
impact on Swedish society. Nevertheless, Sweden retains a degree of insu-
larity that is unmatched by other industrialized countries. This will likely
change to some extent as a result of joining the EU.

Although there have been concerns in the past decade with regard to
racist incidents directed at immigrants, the country retains an enviable
record of social cohesiveness. The political and legal history of Sweden is
characterized by an unusual amount of stability. In the realm of politics,
change has always been gradual. Thus, confl ict among groups or alien-
ation from the body politic has been negligible. An illustration of this is
found in the number of female candidates who continue to make signifi –
cant gains in local, county, and national elections. As a result of the 2006
general election, women occupy 47 percent of the seats in parliament. It
should be noted that gender equality was not confi ned to this particular
election. Women have held key positions in the government, as ministers
of culture, foreign affairs, justice, and public administration, in addition
to the position of speaker of the parliament. Following the 2006 election,
the prime minister formed a cabinet of 21 ministers, of which 10 are
headed by women.

Swedish historians attribute the unusual degree of social stability to a
long-standing respect for the law that dates back to the Viking era. Swedes
generally view law as an instrument that explains the limits of power and
authority granted to those who govern. This attitude is refl ected in their
constitutional law.

WORLD CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS216

The Constitution

Although Sweden’s political system is characterized as stable, it is not
stagnant. The constitutional arrangement has always been fl exible in order
to accommodate change. The country’s constitutional law, which in Sweden
is referred to as fundamental law, is composed of four parts or acts.

The Instrument of Government is considered the most important of
the four acts. Its purpose is to explain how government is organized.
Although the earliest version appeared in 1634, there were signifi cant
revisions in 1720, 1772, 1809, and 1975. The 1975 Instrument of
Government, which has been amended, is similar to the original docu-
ment in that it elaborates how government is organized and operated;
thus, it is like the constitutions of other countries. While many constitu-
tions contain a preamble or an introduction that declares some basic
political principles, such a statement is found in Article 1 of Chapter 1 of
the Act: “All public power in Sweden proceeds from the people. Swedish
democracy is founded on freedom of opinion and on universal and equal
suffrage. It shall be realized through a representative and parliamentary
polity and through local self-government. Public power shall be exer-
cised under the law.”

The foreign observer is often surprised to discover that the Swedish
constitution does not contain a bill of rights. Due process and civil rights
concerns are expressed, however, in a number of provisions found in
Chapter 2 of the 1975 Instrument of Government. The rights and free-
doms elaborated in this chapter are divided into two kinds: (1) absolute
rights and freedoms, and (2) rights and freedoms that may be restricted
by law. Among the absolute rights are: freedom of worship; protection
from compulsion to make known one’s political, religious, cultural, or
similar views; protection from compulsion to belong to a political asso-
ciation, a religious community, or other similar associations; prohibition
against the registration of any person solely because of his or her political
views; and protection of Swedish citizenship.

Some absolute rights and freedoms are of particular signifi cance to
understanding the country’s justice system. They include: the right to
have deprivation of liberty tried by a court of law or an authority of
equal rank without undue delay; prohibition against corporal punish-
ment, torture, and medical treatment to force people to make statements
or keep silent; prohibition against retroactive penal legislation; and pro-
hibition against capital punishment. Absolute rights and freedoms can-
not be altered unless the fundamental law is amended.

Rights and freedoms that may be restricted by law include: freedom
of speech, information, assembly, demonstration, and association;
protection from personal search and from house search or similar intru-
sion; protection from examination of mail, wiretapping, and similar

CHAPTER III • SWEDEN 217

interference with confi dential communication; protection from depri-
vation of liberty and other restraints on freedom of movement; and the
right to public court proceedings.

It should be pointed out that when Sweden joined the European
Union in 1995 it incorporated into its legal system the European
Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental
Freedoms. Furthermore, a new provision of the Instrument of Government
indicates that no law or regulation adopted in Sweden will contravene its
commitment to the European Convention.

The second document that encompasses the fundamental law is the
Act of Succession. It was fi rst drawn up in 1810 and gave the right of suc-
cession to the Swedish throne to the male heirs of the Bernadotte family.
This is referred to as an agnatic order of succession. In 1980, a new Act of
Succession was adopted that was designed to assure gender equality. The
new law simply states that the eldest child (male or female) of the monarch
is considered heir to the throne. Thus, the change permits a full cognatic
succession. Because Sweden is a constitutional monarchy with a parlia-
mentary form of government, the monarch’s duties are largely ceremonial.
These include serving as Head of State, opening the Riksdag each year, and
presiding over the cabinet when there is a change of government.

The third fundamental law document is the Freedom of the Press Act.
This law was fi rst enacted in 1766 and has been the subject of a number of
revisions. The Act essentially enables people to publish materials without
prior censorship from the government. The materials can be one’s own
thoughts and opinions, but may also include offi cial documents. Chapter
2 of the Act explains what constitutes an offi cial document. Basically, it
includes materials held by a public authority and documents that were
drawn up by a public authority and are registered in a fi nal form.

While this Act provides people the right to express themselves in print,
there are some restrictions. These are spelled out in Chapter 7 of the Act
and include such offenses as: treason, espionage, insurrection, negligence
injurious to the interests of the country, incitement to criminal acts, perse-
cution of a population group, and defamation. Moreover, not all govern-
ment documents are available to the public. The Secrecy Act provides
guidance on such matters that pertain to national security interests and
the protection of an individual’s personal and fi nancial information.

The issue of establishing rules for media other than print had been
debated in Sweden since the 1970s. Initially, the attention was directed at
radio and television but progressed to include fi lm and other electronic
recordings. The Fundamental Law on Freedom of Expression, which
came into force on January 1, 1992, addresses those concerns and is the
last of the four fundamental law documents. This Act utilizes the same
principles that are spelled out in the Freedom of the Press Act, namely a
prohibition on censorship and permitting free expression in the modern

WORLD CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS218

media. The principal exception to this policy is the provision for the
review and licensing of fi lms and videos designed for public viewing.

Finally, another characteristic of the Swedish constitutional scheme
should be noted: that the government and administration are considered
to have separate functions. Government ministries are primarily con-
cerned with the preparation of new legislation that is submitted to the
Riksdag. Once the legislation has received the assent of the government
and the Riksdag, it is the responsibility of various central and county
administrative agencies to implement the law.

The Riksdag

The Riksdag Act explains the operation of the Swedish parliament.
While not a part of the fundamental law, this legislation is considered more
signifi cant than regular statute law. The Swedes have long considered
the Riksdag a protector of their rights rather than a threat to their freedom.
This faith was reinforced in 1809 when the Riksdag established the Offi ce
of Parliamentary Ombudsman, which has the responsibility of protecting
the rights of citizens. Unlike most countries that have established a legislative
branch of government, Sweden has maintained a unicameral parliament
since 1971. A constitutional amendment abolished the bicameral system
that had existed from 1866. The Riksdag is formed by direct election, and
suffrage extends to all Swedes who have reached the voting age of 18.
Swedish citizenship and attaining the voting age are also the basic eligibility
requirements to run for a seat in the legislature.

The Riksdag is composed of 349 members, generally from county
districts, who are elected to four-year terms. All the trades and profes-
sions are well represented and no individual group dominates the parlia-
ment. This comes as a surprise to those who expect legislatures to be
dominated by lawyers. It is also worth repeating that 47 percent of the
seats are currently held by women. Moreover, all elections are by propor-
tional representation. This is achieved by having 310 seats assigned to
specifi c electoral districts, while the remaining 39 seats are distributed at
large. This assures that 39 seats are evenly distributed among the politi-
cal parties in proportion to the votes that they receive nationally.

It was pointed out earlier that Sweden is noted for the unusual degree
to which it has been able to maintain a highly stable political and social
system. This is often attributed to a willingness to seek compromise and
to reach consensus opinions. One could not fi nd a better place to illus-
trate these qualities in action than in the work of the Riksdag.

It is also important to comment on two political characteristics that
are common to Sweden as well as to other Scandinavian countries. These
factors contribute signifi cantly to our understanding of the parliamen-
tary process in Sweden. First, it is generally assumed that when a political

CHAPTER III • SWEDEN 219

party receives a majority in an election, it will attempt to implement the
policy presented to the electorate during the election campaign. This
approach is common in countries such as the United States and England.
In Sweden, however, the primary political criteria of the majority party
does not hinge solely on the implementation of its policy. Rather, it is
interested in reaching compromises with all power groups that will enable
the enactment of consensus legislation.

Second, multiparty systems are generally associated with political
instability. Countries such as France and Italy have suffered the conse-
quences of having multiple parties throughout the twentieth century.
This is often cited as a reason for abandoning such a scheme and adopt-
ing a two-party system. However, Sweden and the other Scandinavian
countries prove to be an exception to the rule. Sweden has maintained a
multiparty system and has achieved a high degree of political stability.
The extent to which the Social Democratic Party has dominated Swedish
politics since 1932, however, is a stabilizing infl uence.

The Cabinet

Most of the political power in Sweden rests with the cabinet and the
political party or parties represented in it. The term “cabinet” is used inter-
changeably with “government,” which is common in many European
countries. Following an election, it is determined which of the major politi-
cal parties is capable of governing the country and commanding support
within the Riksdag. Once this is ascertained, the leader of the victorious
party assumes the position of prime minister and selects people to join his
or her cabinet. The cabinet includes the heads of the permanent ministries:
agriculture, culture, defence, education and research, employment, enter-
prise, environment, fi nance, foreign affairs, health and social affairs, inte-
gration and gender equality, justice and public administration. In addition,
several ministers-without-portfolio are appointed to the cabinet.

Although ministers-without-portfolio are generally members of the
Riksdag, there is no regulation that limits selection from that body.
Moreover, the prime minister may appoint people from another party in
recognition of the political forces that are found in the Riksdag. Cabinet
members represent the judicious choice of the prime minister; they are
not subject to the approval of the Riksdag.

While members of the cabinet retain their seats in the Riksdag, they
give up their right to vote in the parliament. Thus, another person assumes
their parliamentary duties as long as they remain in the cabinet. Ministers,
however, are permitted to address the Riksdag.

Swedish ministries are rather small, employing about 100 people,
because they are not responsible for running the daily business of the
government for which they have been assigned. Rather, their work is

WORLD CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS220

limited to initiating legislation that pertains to their area of government
responsibility. The Swedish cabinet is similar to the British cabinet in that
it practices collective responsibility. This means that each cabinet mem-
ber is accountable to the Riksdag for the administration of the entire
government. Although the cabinet does not have to be approved by the
Riksdag, it can be voted out of offi ce by the legislature.

Prime Minister

The political position of the Swedish prime minister is similar to that
of his or her counterpart in England: political versatility is a must. The
prime minister is the leader of the government and, therefore, is respon-
sible both for initiating and defending policy in the Riksdag. As chair of
the cabinet and leader of a political party, he or she assumes an impor-
tant role at election time. Unlike other party leaders, the prime minister
has greater access to information and is in a strategic position to infl u-
ence the Riksdag, interest groups, and voters.

Political Parties

As was mentioned earlier, unlike most countries that have adopted a
multiparty political system, Sweden retains an unusual degree of stability.
Part of this success is attributed to the fact that from the 1920s until fairly
recently, the same fi ve parties have dominated the political scene. These
parties include: (1) the Social Democrats, (2) the Left (formerly known as
Communists), (3) the Liberals, (4) the Moderates (formerly known as
Conservatives), and (5) the Center (formerly known as Agrarians).

For the most part, these parties have as their goal the furtherance of
liberal democratic ideals. The differences among them have been found
largely in the social and economic base of the party membership and in
the speed with which they are willing to achieve their political objectives.
Just as the French tend to divide their political parties into ideological
categories, the Swedes often consider the Social Democrats and the Left
as the socialist bloc and label the other parties as the nonsocialist bloc.
When viewed as two political blocs, rather than distinct parties, the pub-
lic has tended to support both blocs on an equal footing. Recently, two
new parties—the Greens and the Christian Democrats—have emerged to
compete with the traditional parties.

Social Democratic Party The Social Democratic Party is the
largest of the fi ve political parties. It usually receives approximately
40 percent of the votes during an election. Its success has been attributed
to its ability to move from a party of ideology to one that is based on

CHAPTER III • SWEDEN 221

more pragmatic considerations. During the 1920s, the party abandoned
its Marxist ideological stance and set out to achieve reform through
another approach: by increasing its support at the ballot box. The party
directed its attention to all employees and not just to the workers. While
the Social Democratic Party has attracted the support of both blue-collar
and white-collar workers, it has retained strong ties in particular to the
National Swedish Confederation of Trade Unions. The party’s goal of
increasing welfare provisions for all citizens was aided by the extensive
rate and success of industrialization that occurred in Sweden after the
end of World War II. Current budget diffi culties have led to a rethinking
of the speed with which the party attempts to achieve its goal.

Liberal Party The Liberals are more apt to adhere to their ideo-
logical position than the others. Infl uenced by British and American
forms of liberalism, they advocate popular democracy, individual free-
dom, free trade, and social reform. On social issues, they are similar to
the Social Democrats in their belief that social welfare legislation should
be expanded. In fact, this is their major source of criticism of the Social
Democrats. The Liberals believe that the welfare system is inadequate
and that the Social Democrats are guilty of poor planning of the wel-
fare state when they are in power. The Liberals also tend to side with
the Moderates in opposing the Social Democrats’ attempts at economic
leveling through a highly progressive tax system.

Moderate Party Like the Social Democrats, the Moderates
(Conservatives) have made a pronounced shift from their original politi-
cal stance. Before World War I, it was a party in opposition to the emer-
gence of an industrialized society and the popular notion of parliamentary
democracy. Although they have continued to support a strong national
defense and the monarchy, the Moderates have become more liberal on
issues of economic freedom and on social welfare issues impacting health
care, education, childcare, and assistance for the elderly. The party is
similar to the Conservative party of England.

Center Party Until 1958, the Center Party was referred to as the
Farmers or Agrarian Party. Agrarian parties were a common feature of
Scandinavian politics, and although the party was clearly an interest
group, it did not attract the support of all their intended constituents.
Owners of large farms tended to vote for the Moderates, while many
agricultural workers supported the Social Democrats. The party usually
appealed to the independent farmer. Since 1958, they have forged a new
identity, along with a new name, and are identifi ed with opposing high
taxes and large state bureaucracy. In addition, they have gained the sup-
port of environmentalists because of their opposition to nuclear power.

Left Party Sweden’s Left Party was originally the Communist Party
of Sweden. The party took an independent approach to Marxism and did

WORLD CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS222

not align itself with either the Soviet Union or China. Since the fall of
communism in eastern Europe, the party has not only changed its name,
but also has attempted to expand its party base to include communists,
disillusioned social democrats, and environmentalists. The Left Party’s
central policy still adheres to the need to eliminate class differences and
to provide for the basic needs of all.

Green Party The Green Party was the fi rst new party to emerge in
Sweden since the early part of the twentieth century. Although the Center
Party was largely viewed as Sweden’s “green” party until the 1970s, it
supported at that time the use of nuclear reactors and of toxic substances
in agricultural production. With the nuclear accident at Chernobyl in the
former Soviet Union in 1986, which affected Sweden directly with radio-
active fallout, environmentalists established an organizational structure
for a new political party and developed a comprehensive energy policy
that is sensitive to environmental issues. The diffi culty plaguing the Green
Party is that it is perceived as a one-issue party. To help rectify this image,
they have expanded their agenda to include grassroots democracy, social
justice, and nonviolence issues.

Christian Democratic Party Many European countries have
had political parties that place Christian philosophy at the core of their
policies. The Christian Democratic Party was established in 1964 but
was not viewed as a signifi cant party until 1991, when it garnered enough
votes (statute requires a 4 percent minimum) to gain representation in
parliament. The party supports traditional moral and ethical values,
placing an absolute value on human beings, defending human dignity,
and supporting the right to life.

Administration

The administration of Sweden’s government is carried out at three
levels: national, county, and municipal. The national administration is
conducted by government ministries, but as was pointed out earlier, these
ministries are rather small and their principal duty is to initiate legisla-
tion in the Riksdag. Ministries, therefore, are not responsible for the
daily administration of government business; that responsibility is han-
dled by a number of central administrative agencies. For example, the
Ministry of Justice is responsible for the police and the prison service, but
the National Police Board and the National Prison and Probation
Administration are authorized to manage these respective services.

Sweden is divided into 21 counties. Each county has a governor and
a county administrative board. The governor is appointed by the govern-
ment to a six-year term; thus, this person serves as the representative of the
national government in the administration of the county. The governor

CHAPTER III • SWEDEN 223

and the county administrative board are primarily concerned with
regional planning, social welfare issues, and police. Also found at the
county level are county councils, whose members are elected by the pop-
ular vote of their constituents. These councils are responsible for the
healthcare facilities and public transit of the county, and they impose an
income tax on residents to provide these services.

The country is also divided into 290 municipalities. Municipal gov-
ernments are responsible for housing, water and sewage, basic educa-
tion, and public assistance. This work is funded by revenues from an
income tax and a property tax.

Ombudsman

Although the government and the Riksdag play a signifi cant role in
checking the power and authority of Sweden’s administrative bureau-
cracy, the position of ombudsman has long been synonymous with the
country’s attempt to curb government abuse. The word …
CJUS 701

Discussion: Sweden’s Criminal Justice System Grading Rubric

Criteria

Levels of Achievement

Content

(70%)

Advanced

92-100%

Proficient

84-91%

Developing

1-83%

Not Present

Total

Content Mastery

64.25 to 70 points:

· Original post display clear content mastery, and relate precisely to the assigned topic.
· Two (2) Reply Posts display the addition of new ideas, analysis, and/or moving the topic forward.

58.75 to 64 points:

· Original post are related to the assigned topic, but do not provide evidence of subject mastery.
· Two (2) Reply Posts are related to the original post but are not as developed with respect to the addition of new ideas, analysis, and/or moving the topic forward.

1 to 58.5 points:

· Original post are loosely related to the assigned topic, and do not effectively contribute to the development of the discussion. Posts display a minimal or superficial understanding of the topic.
· Missing a reply and/or Reply Posts are unrelated to the other students’ original post or lack the addition of new ideas, analysis, and/or moving the topic forward.

0 points

Not present

Clarity & Support

64.25 to 70 points:

· Original post are balanced in their approach to the topic, and provide evidence of a clear, well-researched position on the topic.
· Reply posts (2) are balanced in their approach to the topic, and provide evidence of a clear, well-researched position on the topic in the context of a reply post.

58.75 to 64 points:

· Original post are mostly balanced, but do not provide evidence of a firm position derived from research or current literature.
· Reply posts (2) are mostly balanced, but do not provide evidence of a firm position derived from research or current literature in the context of a reply post.

1 to 58.5 points:

· Original post show a clear bias, or do not provide a discernable position on the issue. Evidence of research is not present.
· Reply posts (2) show a clear bias, or do not provide a discernable position on the issue. Evidence of research is not present.
· Additionally, student should concentrate on how to respectfully approach differing opinions.

0 points

Not present

Structure (30%)

Advanced

92-100%

Proficient

84-91%

Developing

1-83%

Not Present

Total

Grammar & Spelling

16.5 to 18 points:

· Correct spelling and grammar used throughout essay.
· Post contains fewer than 4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.

15.25 to 16.25 points:

· Post contains fewer than 8 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.
· Few errors (4-5) noted in the interpretation or execution of proper current APA format.

1 to 15 points:

· Posts contains fewer than 10 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.
· Numerous errors (6+) noted in the interpretation or execution of proper current APA format.

0 points

Not present

Current APA Format

16.5 to 18 points:

Minimal errors (1-3) noted in the interpretation or execution of proper current APA format.

15.25 to 16.25 points:

Few errors (4-5) noted in the interpretation or execution of proper current APA format.

1 to 15 points:

Numerous errors (6+) noted in the interpretation or execution of proper current APA format.

0 points

Not present

Word Length

11 to 12 points:

Minimum word count of 800 (800 to 1,200 word count) words for the initial thread and 250 words for each reply.

10.25 to 10.75 points:

Minimum word count for each post is within 90% of the word count requirement.

1 to 10 points:

Minimum word count for each post is within 80% of the word count requirement.

0 points

Not present

Sources

11 to 12 points:

· Initial post includes five unique, relevant scholarly references. Student may judiciously use .gov (CIA/FBI/State Department, and the like) references as their scholarly sources.
· Each reply post should have at least one scholarly reference or gov (CIA/FBI/State Department, and the like).

10.25 to 10.75 points:

References to outside sources is within 90% of the minimum requirement (Requirement: 7 minimum – 5 original and 1 each for the replies).

1 to 10 points:

· Sources referenced are not scholarly or relevant.
· Or, references to outside sources is within 80% of the minimum requirement (Requirement: 7 minimum – 5 original and 1 each for the replies).

Professor Comments:

Total:

/200

Page 1 of 3

CJUS701

Discussion: Sweden’s Criminal Justice System Assignment Instructions

The student will complete 1 Discussion in this course. The student will post one thread of 800–1200 words by May 4, 2021 by 11:59 a.m. (ET). The student must then post 2 replies of at least 250 words each by 11:59 a.m. (ET) on Friday. For each thread, students must support their assertions with at least 5 scholarly citations in current APA format. Each reply must incorporate at least 1 scholarly citation in current APA format. Any sources cited must have been published within the last five years. Acceptable sources include texts, articles, presentations, the Bible, blogs, videos, etc.

Threads are due by 11:59 a.m. (ET) on May 4, 2021. Replies are due by 11:59 a.m. (ET) on Friday of the same week.

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