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Hello, I am looking for someone to write an article on Provision of Free Basic Education in Poor Countries. It needs to be at least 1250 words. This paper discusses the arguments in support of and also against the provision of free universal basic education in poor countries.Providing free universal basic education serves the underprivileged population in poor countries and is a means of eradicating school drop-outs and child labor. Free universal basic education brings the poor children at par with the rich children and allows them to compete with them professionally regardless of the financial status of their families (Yung, 2008). A range of supply and demand factors have an impact on children’s access to schooling in Ghana. The interlocking factors operate in context-specific ways so as to ensure distinctiveness for each access situation. Generally, access to schooling is limited for the children in the rural north compared to those in the urban south. girls in the rural and northern areas have limited access to schooling compared to the girls in the urban or southern regions. Poverty is a major reason why girls opt-out of schools. Child labor is another factor for children to drop out of school. The school-going age population in Ghana is divided between the majority that attend free public schools with minimal school levies and the minority of children who do not need subsidized education because their parents are well-off (Akyeampong et al., 2007). Social returns to the basic education investment propose that the access problem should not just be construed as a choice to be made by the parents. Non-state basic education providers have a major role to play in increasing the access of the underserved population to schooling. Certain NGO providers can adapt their programs to address the marginalized groups’ needs in a better way than the state can. Non-state providers can expand access to schooling for all children by working within a common national strategic framework. This can be achieved by clear stipulations of policy on public and non-state providers’ partnership over basic education. Ghanaian education policy needs to deal with this adequately particularly in basic and secondary education.

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