Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Week 5 Change In Correctional Agencies Law Discussion Help | Abc Paper
+1(978)310-4246 credencewriters@gmail.com
  

Active Learning DiscussionRespond to the stated question, including any relevance to and implications on the field of criminal justice. Be sure to discuss the issue(s) to which the question pertains. Remarks can include your opinion(s), but must be based on experience, research, and/or prior learning. Use this exercise to foster a rich dialogue with your colleagues about issues that are important to the field of criminal justice. During the span of the discussion, you must post to this board on four unique days. Your initial posting must be no less than 300 words and is due no later than Thursday 11:59 PM EST/EDT. The day you post will count as one of your required four unique postings. You will also be required to post responses to at least three of your colleagues’ initial postings. Responses must be no less than 100 words, be posted on at least three unique days, and are due no later than Sunday at 11:59 PM EST/EDT.
week_5_discussion.docx

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Active Learning Discussion
Respond to the stated question, including any relevance to and implications on the field
of criminal justice. Be sure to discuss the issue(s) to which the question pertains.
Remarks can include your opinion(s), but must be based on experience, research, and/or
prior learning. Use this exercise to foster a rich dialogue with your colleagues about
issues that are important to the field of criminal justice.
During the span of the discussion, you must post to this board on four unique days.
Your initial posting must be no less than 300 words and is due no later than Thursday
11:59 PM EST/EDT. The day you post will count as one of your required four unique
postings.
You will also be required to post responses to at least three of your colleagues’ initial
postings. Responses must be no less than 100 words, be posted on at least three unique
days, and are due no later than Sunday at 11:59 PM EST/EDT.
INITIAL POST
As correctional agencies move towards evidence-based-practices, change is inevitable.


Why does some correctional staff resist change when it is inevitable?
Explain current leadership practices that will help facilitate change.
POST 1
posts
Abodunrin Oduyemi posted Apr 2, 2019 9:05 PM
Subscribe
Importance of Team Building
Team building can mean anything from improving communication skills and
resolving conflict to set up a self-directed work team. When people come together for
any type of mission, they bring with them different values, beliefs, and skills to the team.
Team building is designed to help employees understand how to deal with conflict
because it puts people in different roles than they are used to playing. Team building is
designed to help people see things from other people’s points of view. However,
implementing a team building policies where employees may have to leave their work
for a day or two can be a challenge, especially when some employees are reluctant to
leave their desks even to go for lunch ( Jerene, 2016)
Change
Leaders, managers, and supervisors in an organization realize that not every
problem will require money to solve; sometimes it is just about moving with the trends.
Money is essential in any organization, but it can fail to buy or even to deliver the best
results if used in the wrong context. Leaders, managers, and supervisors need to act in a
manner that would make changes to the organization go as smoothly as possible and
would also make resistance to change futile. However, it is not just about adopting
change; it depends highly on how to go about it because an organization can be good at
embracing change but does not have the necessary skills to do it which would make the
efforts into changes futile.
Why People are Resistant to change
Change is not as easy as it looks and one thing to note is that there are many
factors that come into play as to why people resist change. Gladwin and McConnel
(2014), stated that a manager’s failure to keep up with a legitimate change in a chosen
profession could severely a manager’s effectiveness as well as future prospects. One of
the reason employees are afraid of change is because of fear because change has been
known to implement fear for other people. Another reason why people are resistant to
change is that people are not big believers in drastically new techniques or the
workability of marvelous new technology (Gladwin & McConnel, 2014).
People would resist change when the rewards are not aligned to their needs.
Employees would resist change if they do not see a reward for implementing the change
and without a reward, it could be hard to motivate employees to support the move.
Other reasons why people would resist change are peer pressure, organizational politics,
fear of failure and poor implementation policy.
For change to be achieved by leaders, the leaders must establish attainable
targets because unattainable targets will get the organization nowhere, which would
result in a waste of resources and time. In order for change to be achieved, transparent
and faultless communication should flow not only from top to bottom level but also from
bottom to top. The organization also requires constructing futuristic plans for generating
positive results. The business also needs to have good risk management that should be
able to understand and measure the risks and also help the system in the smooth flow of
the company for a more extended period.
Leadership Practice that helps Supervisors Implement Change
For change to take shape; communication should form the hallmark of strong
leadership. Maxwell (1998) agrees that communication helps to create trust and
openness; not forgetting it helps to build bonds and promote teamwork. the best
practice for a leader in implementing change would be to tell them what to do, convince
them to do it and involve them in planning for the change (Gladwin, &, 2014).
Reference
Gladwin, B. P., & McConnell, C. R. (2014). The Effective Corrections Manager. Burlington,
MA:Jones& Bartlett Learning
Maxwell, J. (1998). The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership. New York. Barnes & Noble
Jerene, G. (2016). The HR Directors Guide to Teambuilding. Retrieved from:
https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/features/hr-directors-guide-teambuilding/
POST 2
Olisia Rowe
Active Learning Question: Week 5
CRJ-523
As correctional agencies move towards evidence-based-practices, change is inevitable.
1. Why does some correctional staff resist change when it is inevitable?
Change for anyone is hard to accept because no one likes the dealing with the unfamiliar.
People become comfortable in their positions and duties especially in the correctional
setting. People fight against change because it requires us to grown and do so something
new. But it seems to be part of the human experience to resist change on a gut level, no
matter the nature of the change – even if it’s positive and much- anticipated. If the
change is not something we’re excited about, our resistance quickly turns to resentment.
And (unconsciously, perhaps), we telegraph and impart that unhappiness to everyone
around us. The thing is, even though it’s tremendously challenging, change is good. If
we’re not changing, we’re stagnating (or dead). Change forces us to adapt, innovate,
experience new things, solve problems, take risks (2010). A lot of correctional staff
become complacent in their jobs which is why is so hard for some of them to adapt
changes within the agency.
2. Explain current leadership practices that will help facilitate change
Many organizations are also creating teams of employees to accomplish work goals.
These companies give increasing amounts of responsibility to these teams by allowing
them to be self-managed or assigning them the authority to plan and implement
strategic change. In some instances, entire plants have been built around work teams
(Landrum, Howell, & Paris, 2000). This is great way to incorporate change in such a
major organization as corrections. It is more effective for a team of leaders to motivate
people to change rather than one of two people. Another great way to make people
receptive to change is to allow them seeing you utilizing the changes. People are more
open to do what you do rather than what you say,
References:
Change is good. change is bad. change is inevitable. (2010). Veterinary Economics, 51(9),
4. Retrieved from https://saintleo.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search-proquestcom.saintleo.idm.oclc.org/docview/749646482?accountid=4870https://saintleo.idm.ocl
c.org/login?url=https://search-proquestcom.saintleo.idm.oclc.org/docview/226918808?accountid=4870
Landrum, N.E., Howell, J.P., L. (2000). Leadership for strategic change Leadership &
Organization Development Journal, 21(3), 150-156. Retrieved from
https://saintleo.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search-proquestcom.saintleo.idm.oclc.org/docview/226918808?accountid=4870
POST 3
Raymond Swallows posted Apr 3, 2019 4:27 PM
Subscribe
“Whosoever desires constant success must change his conduct with the times.” –Niccolo
Machiavelli
Given that corrections is constantly evolving, change is absolutely inevitable. Much like
every other industry, resistance to change virtually guarantees failure. If not failure,
certainly inefficiency. Correctional practices of the 1930s through the 1950s was more
focused on rehabilitation. The 1960s saw an increase in community corrections
programs, founded under the philosophy that rehabilitation could better occur in the
community rather than in facilities. Fast forward to the 1980s and yet another
philosophical swing to more of a justice model with hard and fast incarceration
sentences, minimum/mandatory sentences, and “3 strike” rules that saw offenders being
imprisoned for life, in what would normally not substantiate such sentences. It would
seem the 2000s have found their way back around to a rehabilitative model, as
evidenced with the amount of offender programs available in various jails and prisons
around the country. In my local jail for instance, when I first began working as a
detention officer back in 1994, the only rehabilitative programs we had at the county
level was a program called “Life Skills” and the school board’s GED program. Everyone
knows what a GED is. However, the Life Skills class few people know about. What it does
is incorporate some academic elements with real-life skills that people need to be
successful in the community. At our jail, it included computer familiarization, banking
and economic training, cooking education, anger management stuff, government and law
classes, etc. There is research that shows inmates who successfully complete programs
like the Life Skills class reduce the overall recidivism rate.
As of the latter 2010s, our jail has countless numbers of inmate vocational programs, a
dedicated reintroduction specialist, community monitoring specialist, and more. The
officers within our jail are highly suspicious of these programs and their efficacy. One of
the reasons why the officers doubt the programs is because they tend to see several
repeat offenders almost persistently in these programs every time they return to jail.
Granted, the small number of repeat offenders that are well known to the officers
represent a much smaller part of the whole than the officers would have you to believe.
However, if you were to ask the officers, they would repeat probably verbatim the
argument I made above that they think the programs are ineffective because of the
repeat customers.
Why does some correctional staff resist change when it is inevitable?
Status quo offers a certain amount of security and comfort. According to Gladwin &
McConnell (2014), some of the reasons for resistance relate to managerial changes that
may involve a change to whom individuals report to, new management takes a
department over, job tasks are changed or how the job is done is changed, technological
advances and changes, etc.
Explain current leadership practices that will help facilitate change.
Again, according to Gladwin & McConnell (2014), there are three ways to institute
change in the correctional setting. First and foremost, law enforcement generally is
autocratic; the troops function on orders passed down through the chain of command.
Thus, implementation of change through directive is generally the preferred and most
frequent method used in law enforcement and corrections. I cannot tell you how many
times through my career I have witnessed “change for the sake of change” and it always
drove me crazy. However, at the end of the day, as a subordinate you do as you are told
to do. An order is an order and not following an order that is lawful, ethical, and moral is
tantamount to insubordination which no one wants. The next method would be by
convincing the staff that the impending change is the right thing to do. Through this
method, the manager would explain what the change is and why it needs to happen.
Lastly, if at all possible, involve the employees in the change. Not every instance of
organizational change can involve input from the taskers, but some can. There is no
better way to gain acceptance than involvement.
Through a combination of the above with excellent communication to those involved,
and proper planning for the change, leadership can set a better stage for success relative
to whatever the change is (Gladwin & McConnell, 2014).
~RS
Gladwin, B., & McConnell, C. R. (2014). The effective corrections manager: Correctional
supervision for the future (3rd ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.
Effective action: advice from Machiavelli. (2011, January 10).
Retrieved from https://www.businessinsider.com/effective-action-advice-frommachiavelli-2011-1

Purchase answer to see full
attachment

error: Content is protected !!