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****PLEASE USE SIMPLE LANGUAGE! Nothing too long or too complicated. JUST simple words and concise sentences*******NO outside sources!! ONLY the ones I provided***The Writing Prompt: In 2014, the
University of California created the Global
Food Initiative (GFI). According to UC
President Janet Napolitano, “Based on your analysis of the reading in Unit 1, justify an evaluation of the GFI. Is the GFI an
effective proposal for addressing problems related to food insecurity, health, and sustainability?By asking you to evaluate the GFI, we want you to make an argument about its strengths and/or
weaknesses. To do this successfully, you will need to choose appropriate criteria to support your
judgment. You will develop these criteria in your weekly discussions as you analyze and discuss
the course materials for this project.
By writing in this genre, you are expected to include an arguable thesis, reasoning and well-
documented evidence, and at least one opposing viewpoint or counterargument (although you may
include more than one!). We also encourage you to use multimodal elements (pictures, images,
graphs, charts etc.) to strengthen your evaluation.
As you compose your project through multiple drafts, imagine you are writing to a UCSD
committee comprised of administrators, faculty and students. This committee is interested in
reading student evaluations of the GFI before they decide whether to make any changes.
***PLEASE PLEASE follow the instructions carefully! Don’t miss any details such as the counterargument******more requirements are attached!***HERE ARE YOUR sources you MUST use:1. Attached UC GFI. Citation is: University of California Office of the President. Global Food Initiative: Food and Housing Security at the University of California. Berkeley: U of California Press, 2017 2. Attached article by Holt-Giménez, E. Citation is:Holt-Giménez, E. (2011). Food security, food justice, or food sovereignty. Cultivating food justice: Race, class, and sustainability, 309-330. 3. Online article by Goldrick and Broton. Citation is: Goldrick-Rab, S. & Broton, K. (2015, September 25). To cut costs, college students are buying less food and even going hungry. The Conversation. Retrieved from https://theconversation.com/to-cut-costs-college-students-are-buying-less-food-and-even-going-hungry-479754. Attached article by Watson. (Optional)***There is also a few summary of the sources in a document attached. It will help you better understand the sources***Let me know if you have any questions ASAP. Thanks!
wcwp_10b_food_ethics_writing_project__1_prompt___justify_an_evaluation.pdf

uc_global_food_initiative.pdf

holt_giminez___food_security_justice_sovereignty.pdf

watson_et_al.__food_literacy.pdf

a_few_summary_of_the_sources.docx

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WCWP 10B: Food Ethics
2018-2019
Writing Project #1: Justifying an Evaluation
Due Date: Submit your final draft to TritonEd before 5pm on Friday, May 3rd.
Background and Context for the Assignment: This course is designed to teach you
how to write different types of arguments for different audiences. In the first project, we are asking
you to “justify an evaluation,” which is a type of argument. As the St. Martin’s Guide to Writing
explains, an evaluative argument makes a claim (a judgement or evaluation) about a question, text
or issue for which there is no single right answer. Instead of basing your claims simply on your
personal opinion, we want to teach you how to base them on careful and critical analysis of the
evidence at hand. Instead of ignoring alternative perspectives, your evaluation should engage them
ethically and in a transparent manner. We hope that by learning how to develop evaluative
arguments you will become a stronger reader, critical thinker and writer.
The Writing Prompt:
In 2014, the
University of California created the Global
Food Initiative (GFI). According to UC
President Janet Napolitano, “The initiative
aligns the university’s research, outreach and
operations in a sustained effort to develop,
demonstrate and export solutions —
throughout California, the United States and
the world — for food security, health and
sustainability.”
Based on your analysis of the reading in Unit 1, justify an evaluation of the GFI. Is the GFI an
effective proposal for addressing problems related to food insecurity, health, and sustainability?
By asking you to evaluate the GFI, we want you to make an argument about its strengths and/or
weaknesses. To do this successfully, you will need to choose appropriate criteria to support your
judgment. You will develop these criteria in your weekly discussions as you analyze and discuss
the course materials for this project.
By writing in this genre, you are expected to include an arguable thesis, reasoning and welldocumented evidence, and at least one opposing viewpoint or counterargument (although you may
include more than one!). We also encourage you to use multimodal elements (pictures, images,
graphs, charts etc.) to strengthen your evaluation.
As you compose your project through multiple drafts, imagine you are writing to a UCSD
committee comprised of administrators, faculty and students. This committee is interested in
reading student evaluations of the GFI before they decide whether to make any changes.
1
The Works Cited Page and The Acknowledgements Statement: You are not
required to use a certain number of sources for this project. However, to write an informed
evaluation, you will need to engage credibly with some course materials. When you do so, you
must cite all sources and include a properly formatted Works Cited page with your project.
While the Works Cited documents all the sources that you use, the Acknowledgements statement
allows you to document other sources of help and feedback. This includes any assistance you
received at any stage of writing, from your instructor, classmates, friends, and tutors—anyone or
any source that has helped you. This includes websites such as Grammarly, etc.
Including Acknowledgements protects you because it provides a place for you to acknowledge all
of the help you have received. If you do not acknowledge the help you’ve received, but we see that
you’ve obtained help inappropriately, you will be referred to the Academic Integrity office for
review and may face sanctions.
How will your writing be graded and assessed on this project?
The paper will be evaluated based on the following guidelines for writing a successful proposal:
● Rhetorical Knowledge – Does the project justify an evaluation with a well-written,
engaging and arguable position about the GFI? Is the position consistently well-developed
throughout the project?
● Rhetorical Knowledge – Does the project use argumentative strategies such as claims,
reasons, criteria, evidence, and analysis? Are these strategies contextualized and welldeveloped for the intended audience?
● Rhetorical Knowledge – Does the project engage with relevant opposing viewpoints
effectively?
● Critical Thinking and Reading – Does the project engage with well-chosen course
materials in developing criteria, supporting evidence and analysis?
● Knowledge of Conventions – Is the argument and analysis focused, clear and easy to
follow, based on its use of controlling ideas, transitions, and other conventions (e.g. tone,
mechanics, proofreading etc.)?
2
Global Food Initiative:
Food and Housing
Security at the
University of California
December 2017
This report was made possible by funding from the
University of California (UC) Office of the President Global
Food Initiative. The University of California Global Food
Initiative addresses one of the critical issues of our time:
how to sustainably and nutritiously feed a world population
expected to reach eight billion by 2025. By building on
existing efforts and creating new collaborations among
UC’s 10 campuses, affiliated national laboratories and the
Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the Global
Food Initiative is working to develop and export solutions
for food security, health and sustainability throughout
California, the United States and the world. For more
information, visit: www.ucop.edu/global-food-initiative.
Contributors to the study and report include the following
organizations and individuals: UCOP Institutional Research
and Academic Planning (Pamela Brown, Tongshan Chang,
Xiaohui Zheng, Daniel Byrd), UCOP Student Affairs
(Christopher Carter, Jerlena Griffin-Desta, Eric Heng),
Nutrition Policy Institute (Suzanna Martinez, Lorrene
Ritchie), Campus and Systemwide Food Access Security
and Basic Needs Committee Members, Ruben E. Cañedo,
Claire Doan, Tim Galarneau, Carolyn McMillan and Gale
Sheean-Remotto.
For general information, please contact the UC Global Food
Initiative at GFI@ucop.edu.
For media inquiries, please contact the University of
California, Office of the President Media Line at
(510) 987-9200.
For data inquiries, please contact the UC’s Institutional
Research and Academic Planning at irap@ucop.edu.
UC Global Food Initiative: Food and Housing Security at the University of California, 12/2017
2
Introduction
Meeting people’s basic needs is a growing challenge in the United States, including on college campuses.
Research has shown a significant impact to students and their academic experiences stemming from a lack of
basic needs security. A new study conducted at the K-12 level5 applied existing knowledge about the link
between growing up in households without enough to eat and poor academic performance years later.
Nationally, investment in public higher education has not kept pace with increases in the cost of living.
Additionally, more than half of the students who reported experiencing hunger during their college years also
held paying jobs or received financial aid, and many were enrolled in a meal plan.6 Although financial aid helps
with costs, non-tuition expenses can account for more than 60 percent of the total cost of attending a college
or university.7
The issue of unmet basic needs affects students across the country at both two- and four- year colleges and
universities and is not isolated to those from lower-income families:
• In a 2015 survey of students at 10 community colleges in seven states, 52 percent of respondents reported
some degree of food insecurity within 30 days of the survey.8
• A 2015 survey of low- and middle-income undergraduates, mostly at Wisconsin four-year colleges, found
that 61 percent reported some food insecurity during the prior academic year (Goldrick-Rab, 2015).
• In a national survey of college students, more than 20 percent said they had experienced hunger in the past
month (Dubick, 2016), and nearly 10 percent said they had been homeless at some point within a year of
the survey (Field, 2017).
• Food insecurity among college students has been associated with poor health, poor academic performance
and mental health symptoms such as depression and anxiety (Freudenberg, et al., 2011; 2011; PattonLopez, et al., 2014; Goldrick-Rab, Broton and Eisenberg, 2015; Knol, et al., 2017).
In California, the University of California and other public higher education segments are collaborating through
research and awareness efforts to better understand and support students’ food and basic needs security.
Local governments and organizations are addressing the issue through legislation and promotion of partner
programs such as CalFresh.
Like the national studies, those centered on California indicate basic needs are a challenge across our twoand four-year institutions of public higher education:
• In fall 2015 a study by the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) found that about 63 percent of
students surveyed experience food insecurity, with 38 percent of those students indicating very low food
security.
5
6
7
8
Published article, Kids who suffer hunger in first years lag behind peers in school, Ruth Chaterjee,
https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/03/23/520997010/kids-who-suffer-hunger-in-first-years-lag-behind-their-peers-inschool%20on%20September%2012
Hunger on Campus. College and University Food Bank Alliance. Retrieved from
http://studentsagainsthunger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Hunger_On_Campus.pdf
The real price of college. Wisconsin Hope Lab. Retrieved from https://tcf.org/content/report/the-real-price-of-college/
Hungry to Learn: Addressing Food & Housing Insecurity Among Undergraduates. Wisconsin Hope Lab,
http://wihopelab.com/publications/Wisconsin_hope_lab_hungry_to_learn.pdf
UC Global Food Initiative: Food and Housing Security at the University of California, 12/2017
8
• A preliminary study released in winter 2016 by California State University found 8.7 percent experience
homelessness and 21 percent lack consistent food sources (Crutchfield, et al., 2016).
• Based on a 2015 USDA report, California ranks 48 out 51 administrative districts (50 states and
Washington, D.C.) in SNAP (CalFresh) participation lagging among those eligible to take part in the
program.
The University of California’s mission of research, teaching and public service continues to drive UC’s
engagement to tackle basic needs challenges. Through the development and sharing of best practices across
California public higher education segments, ongoing institutional research and programmatic interventions, UC
is working to address the various facets of basic needs security. A recent outcome of the intersegmental
partnership includes working with the state legislature that passed legislation supporting “hunger-free” campuses
across all three higher education segments. With statewide and systemwide coordination, the university remains
committed to exploring the root causes of basic needs security among students, while actively identifying and
implementing solutions to enhance their well-being.
UC Global Food Initiative: Food and Housing Security at the University of California, 12/2017
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University of California Efforts
UC Global Food Initiative
In 2014, University of California President Janet Napolitano and UC’s 10 chancellors launched the UC Global
Food Initiative (GFI). The GFI involves all 10 UC campuses, UC Agriculture and Natural Resources and
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, aligning the university’s research and outreach in the fields of
agriculture, medicine, nutrition, climate science, public policy and social science, biological science,
humanities, arts and law. There are multiple projects under the GFI with efforts focusing on one of the critical
issues of our time: how to sustainably and nutritiously feed a growing world population.
In 2015, with the formation of the GFI Food Access and Security subcommittee and under the coordination of
the subcommittee co-chairs, the issue of food insecurity was more deeply examined across the campuses.
Based on the findings from the subcommittee’s efforts and recognizing there was a growing concern around
student food security, President Napolitano allocated $75,000 per campus to address the immediate
challenges of ensuring student access to nutritious food, while GFI co-chairs began examining the best
approach for addressing the issue. In response to the findings from the GFI-funded Student Food Access and
Security Survey (SFASS) in 2015 and a multiyear strategic plan created by the systemwide GFI co-chairs, the
president committed an additional $3.3 million over a two-year period to provide emergency assistance,
financial and food literacy, life skills training and to establish food security working groups on each campus.
The effort is built upon campuses participating across the system in processes that leverage campus expertise
coupled with a systems approach to problem-solving. The Food Access and Security Basic Needs (FAS-BN)
subcommittee, sponsored by GFI and overseen by UC’s Office of Student Affairs, has established a working
group on each campus that includes equitable representation from campus stakeholders. Led by GFI cochairs, the FAS-BN workgroups have been working closely together to address basic needs challenges and
develop implementation plans that address the unique needs of each respective campus. Based on the
SFASS 2015 findings and campus input, the subcommittee workgroup recognized that efforts to not only
address immediate emergency relief were needed, but consideration of long-term sustainable solutions to
address student basic needs would be critical.
UC Global Food Initiative: Food and Housing Security at the University of California, 12/2017
10
UC Food and Housing Security Framework
UC students are fortunate to benefit from strong institutional and state financial aid programs that help address
both fee and non-fee costs. These programs make UC far more socioeconomically diverse than any other
similarly competitive universities. However, despite the university’s generous financial aid programs, many UC
students face food and housing insecurity.
In order to help students meet their basic needs
during their time at UC and beyond, the FAS-BN
subcommittee created the UC Basic Needs Model to
address holistic preventative education and training.
The goal is to consistently reduce and eventually
eliminate the number of students in need of
emergency resources and/or experiencing a crisis.
UC’s Basic Needs Model approaches this goal by
beginning with comprehensive educational efforts
aimed at all students. This action-oriented model
includes the establishment of a basic needs
committee on each campus to support systemwide
coordination of work and sharing of knowledge.
Figure 1: Food Access & Security Framework
UC’s systemwide approach focuses on efforts that include:
• Updating pre-college programming curriculum and materials to teach effective basic needs strategies to
high school and community college participants.
• Enhancing financial aid communications and skills training to include housing and food costs awareness
and available student support services.
• Expanding existing crisis response teams to provide
student support and guidance.
• Creating central basic needs online campus resources.
• Increasing collaboration with state and county offices to
grow CalFresh registration of UC students where less
than 10 percent of our potentially eligible students on
our undergraduate campuses have enrolled.
• Expanding existing Swipe Out Hunger programs with
campus dining services.
Figure 2: Student Experience Logic Model
• Developing food voucher benefits and financial aid guidelines to support increased resources for students.
• Expanding healthy and culturally diverse food distribution and pantry sites.
• Establishing wellness and homeless student resolution protocols.
UC Global Food Initiative: Food and Housing Security at the University of California, 12/2017
11
• Continually reviewing and evaluating institutional student assessment tools.
At the same time, the FAS-BN subcommittee has recognized that this work is a united effort across campus
departments and institutional lines. Therefore, the committee has organized the framework of the model
around the following five components:
1. On-campus student services and programming, such as food pantries, demonstration cooking kitchens
and financial literacy materials;
2. Off-campus partnerships and engagement, such as CalFresh outreach and application assistance,
CalFresh enrollment, food banks and local farmers markets;
3. Campus coordination, such as centralized and accessible resources, or college student finances and
nutrition workshops;
4. Systemwide coordination, such as hosting a quarterly systemwide convening of workgroups and
statewide conferences which include our intersegmental partners; and
5. Research and data collection through UCUES, GSWBS, and campus surveys and focus groups.
UC campuses are in the second year of executing their 2016-2018 implementation plans. So far, campuses
have implemented best practices, shared lessons learned and continue to advance efforts to meet each local
community’s particular needs. From establishing and enhancing food pantry/distribution efforts and bolstering
campus gardens/farms for student engaged production to streamlining communication channels to ensure
target populations have access to resources, a systemwide integration of support is being implemented.
Available resources of activities taking place across UC can be accessed through the Student Food Access
and Security Toolkit. 9
Cumulative campus impacts to date since the inception of the FAS-BN systemwide project include:
• Established food access and distribution channels that include choice-based pantries, pop-up markets, and
mobile access sites to centralized Basic Needs Hubs offering a range of support services (i.e., UC Irvine
and UC San Diego).
• Efforts to raise student awareness and reduce stigma through the development of print and social media
basic needs messaging and creation of campus basic needs webpages for centralization of on- and off-site
resources.
• Increased supplemental acute support resources that include campus meal voucher/Swipes programs,
retail grocery gift cards and emergency financial assistance to address student basic needs.
• Increased staff and student peer-based CalFresh promotion and enrollment assistance.
• Added new basic needs evaluation and campus assessment measures to ensure a responsive model of
improving support services.
Campus specific impacts and advances that have been undertaken include:
9
Food Security and Access Toolkit, http://www.ucop.edu/global-food-initiative/_files/food-security-toolkit.pdf
UC Global Food Initiative: Food and Housing Security at the University of California, 12/2017
12
UC Berkeley
• Developed and hosted training on college student basic needs to institutional outreach and through
recruitment entities such as the Centers for Educational Partnership on campuses that support preparation
for and success in higher education.
• Increased the UC Berkeley CalFresh Clinic services by approximately 200 percent in a single academic
year with support from the Alameda County Food Bank (from 70 to 208 participants).
• In November 2017 UC Berkeley hosted the first-of-its-kind CalFresh Mega Clinic where 184 applications
were submitted within five hours. UC Berkeley Food Pantry has increased its services from 424 to 2,113
unique students since opening in 2014.
• Hired a UC Berkeley Farm & Gardens Coordinator who is producing a five-year strategic plan to coordinate
research, courses, programming, harvesting and distribution.
• Launched a campus basic needs website, centralizing basic needs information, materials and resources
(basicneeds.berkeley …
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