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2-4 page written report. 600 – 1200 words. Please do not use science jargon – should be understood by all audiences.Please cite sources in MLA format and include in-text citations.The essay should discuss the following (please see the attached grading rubric):Describe different types of fuel cells.Explain how each type of fuel cell works, especially from the chemistry point of view.Describe how a fuel-cell-powered vehicle works.Discuss the benefits and drawbacks of fuel-cell-powered vehicles compared to gasoline-powered vehicles.Decide which vehicle to buy and give reasons for the recommendation.PLEASE LOOK AT THE RUBRIC and contact me for questions. No grammatical mistakes.
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Graded Assignment
SCI304B: Honors Chemistry | Unit 11 | Lesson 1: Fuel Cells
Grading Rubric
Honors Project 2: Fuel Cells
Your teacher will use this grading rubric to evaluate your project.
Criteria
18 Points
14–17 Points
10–13 Points
6–9 Points
0–5 Points
Describe different
types of fuel cells.
Student has a thorough description of 4
types of fuel cells.
Student has a
thorough description
of 3 types of fuel cells.
Student has a
thorough description
of 2 types of fuel cells.
Student has a
thorough description
of 1 type of fuel cell.
Student neither
mentions nor
discusses the types
of fuel cells.
Explain how each
type of fuel cell
works, especially
from the chemistry
point of view.
Student has a thorough description of
how 4 types of fuel cells work, including
diagrams and explanations.
Student has a
thorough description
of how 3 types of fuel
cells work, including
diagrams and
explanations.
Student has a
thorough description
of how each type of 2
types of fuel cells
work, including
diagrams and
explanations.
Student has a
thorough description
of how 1 type of fuel
cell works, including
diagram and
explanation.
Student does not
discuss how the fuel
cell works at all.
Describe how a fuelcell-powered vehicle
works.
Student explains how a fuel-cellpowered vehicle works, including
diagrams of the car, lists of components,
and explanations of each component.
Student discusses
75% of the topics.
Student discusses
50% of the topics.
Student discusses
25% of the topics.
Student discusses
less than 25% or the
topics or none at all.
Discuss the benefits
and drawbacks of
fuel-cell-powered
vehicles compared
to gasoline-powered
vehicles.
Student has written a thorough
description of the advantages and
disadvantages of fuel-cell-powered
vehicles compared to gasoline-powered
vehicles, addressing the following:
• Pollution
• Mileage per gallon
• Range
• Effect on oil consumption
Student discusses
75% of the topics.
Student discusses
50% of the topics.
Student discusses
25% of the topics.
Student discusses
less than 25% or the
topics or none at all.
© 2009 K12 Inc. All rights reserved.
Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited.
Page 1 of 2
Graded Assignment
SCI304B: Honors Chemistry | Unit 11 | Lesson 1: Fuel Cells
Criteria
18 Points
14–17 Points
10–13 Points
6–9 Points
0–5 Points
Decide which vehicle
to buy and give
reasons for the
recommendation.
Student makes a clear decision and
uses research mentioned in the paper
as support; for example, “I recommend
a hydrogen fuel-celled car because…”
Student says that
either car would be
acceptable and uses
research mentioned in
the paper as support;
for example, “I would
be satisfied with either
car because…”
Student decides on
one car but does not
use research to
support the decision;
for example, “I like the
way [a car] looks.”
Student says that
either car would be
acceptable and does
not use research
mentioned in the
paper as support.
Student does not
make a decision; for
example, “It’s too hard
to tell now what car I
might like in the
future.”
© 2009 K12 Inc. All rights reserved.
Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited.
Page 2 of 2
Graded Assignment
Name:
SCI304B: Honors Chemistry | Unit 11 | Lesson 1: Fuel Cells
Date:
Graded Assignment
Honors Project 2: Fuel Cells
Write the final draft of your project. Be sure to follow these requirements and recommendations when completing
your draft:

Open a new Microsoft Word document. Type your name, your teacher’s name, your school name, and
the date at the top of your document. To help your teacher know from whom the project came, save the
file as:
CHEM_304B_11_01_Honors_Project_2_Final_Draft_FirstInitial_LastName.doc
Example: CHEM_304B_10_01_Honors_Project_1_Final_Draft_M_Smith.doc
Type your project in the document you create.

The recommended length requirement for this project is 2–4 pages (600–1,200 words), double spaced,
using 12-point Times New Roman font. It is acceptable to write more than this; however, not developing
your ideas enough to meet the length requirement may cause you to lose points.

Check online for the due date of your final draft. Use the time line in the lesson to pace your work. Turn
the final draft in by the due date to receive full credit on the assignment.

Your final draft will be evaluated against a grading rubric. A copy of the rubric is included in the lesson.
Read over the rubric before you submit your final draft to your teacher. The final draft assignment is
worth 90 points.
Don’t hesitate to contact your teacher if you have any questions about revising your project. Your teacher is there
to help you.
(18 points)
Criterion
Describe different types of fuel cells.
Score
Explain how each type of fuel cell works, especially from the chemistry point
of view.
Score
Feedback
(18 points)
Criterion
Feedback
© 2009 K12 Inc. All rights reserved.
Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited.
Page 1 of 2
Graded Assignment
SCI304B: Honors Chemistry | Unit 11 | Lesson 1: Fuel Cells
(18 points)
Criterion
Describe how a fuel-cell-powered vehicle works.
Score
Discuss the benefits and drawbacks of fuel-cell-powered vehicles compared to
gasoline-powered vehicles.
Score
Decide which vehicle to buy and give reasons for the recommendation.
Score
Feedback
(18 points)
Criterion
Feedback
(18 points)
Criterion
Feedback
Your Score
© 2009 K12 Inc. All rights reserved.
Copying or distributing without K12’s written consent is prohibited.
___ of 90
Page 2 of 2
Honors Research Projects
In-Text Citations
Include a citation for every piece of information that is not common knowledge. Also include
a citation every time you quote or closely paraphrase an author’s words.
The in-text citation goes at the end of the sentence containing the source information. The
citation belongs in parentheses. Provide only the author’s last name and the page number
or numbers. Do not put a comma between the author’s name and the page number. Books
and magazine articles use the same author-page form:
(Curry 19)
If the author’s name is not known, your citation should give the title of the work and the
page number. Put the title of an article in quotation marks:
(“Free or Not, They Made a Contribution” 22)
For entries in encyclopedias or dictionaries, you do not have to give the page number
because those reference books list entries in alphabetical order. Give the title of the entry.
For example, if you cite the “Douglass, Frederick” entry in Encyclopedia Britannica, write the
in-text citation as follows:
(“Douglass, Frederick”)
For websites, simply give the author’s name without the page number. If a website does not
give the author’s name, cite the title of the site. Use italics if you are citing an entire website
and quotation marks if you are citing a specific page within a website:
(Curry)
(Africans in America)
(“People and Events”)
In-text citations may sound complicated, but they are actually simple. The rules boil down
to one general principle: Give the author’s name and the page number, if possible. If the
author’s name is not available, give the title.
The Works Cited Page
When writing a paper, the Works Cited list may begin on the last page of your text or on a
separate page. This list includes all of the works you actually cited. If you read and took
notes on a source but did not include it in your paper, do not include it on your Works Cited
page.
On the Works Cited page, present all of the entries in a single alphabetized list regardless of
type. Books, articles, websites, and other types of sources all make up the one list. Entries
that begin with the author’s name and entries that begin with the title are all alphabetized
together.
If a citation contains more than one line, indent all lines after the first one.
Book
A citation for a book includes the following information, in this order, with this punctuation:
Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name. Title of Book. City: Publisher, Publication Year.
Curry, Leonard P. The Free Black in Urban America, 1800–1850. Chicago: U of Chicago P,
1981.
Article
A citation for an article includes the following information, in this order, with this
punctuation:
Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name. “Title of Article.” Name of Periodical Day Month
Year: Pages.
Barstow, Emma. “How Free Blacks Lived.” American Past 6 July 2008: 32–35.
Note: There is no period after the name of the periodical.
Encyclopedia
A citation for an entry in an encyclopedia or dictionary includes the following information,
in this order, with this punctuation:
Author’s Last and First Name (if available). “Title of Article.” Name of Reference Work.
Edition. Publication Year.
“Slavery.” The Columbia Encyclopedia. 5th ed. 1993.
Website
A citation for a website includes the following information in this order, with this
punctuation:
Author’s Last and First Name. “Title of Page.” Name of Entire Website. Day Month Year of
creation or most recent update of website. Publisher or Sponsor Information. Day Month
Year you accessed the website .
Tyson, Peter. “Living at Extremes.” NOVA Online Adventure: Into the Abyss. 2000. WGBH
Educational Foundation. 15 Jan. 2007
.
At times, not all possible information is available; for example, the name of the author of an
article or Web page may be missing. In such cases, you omit that part of the citation. For
more information, refer to the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, Sixth
Edition, by Joseph Gibaldi. You can also find good summaries of citation form on several
websites, such as the following:
The Owl at Purdue, http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/557/01/
Duke University Libraries, http://library.duke.edu/research/citing/
MLA Citation Style, Cornell University,
http://www.library.cornell.edu/newhelp/res_strategy/citing/mla.html

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