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you did HWK4 the topic and HWK 5 annotated bibliography and position argument essay now time for presentation for this assignment I need from you powerpoint four slides about what I learn in this topic.Please make it easy to understand because English is my second language and I want to present good. I attached the work that you did for me Presentation, you will give a flash talk: a brief, TED Talk-style presentation on what you learned in your Position Argument Essay research. The presentation should be very focused on your stance and the evidence for it and run between 4 and 5-minutes long. Consider visual aids, presentation style, and your audience’s interest while preparing. If you want to use visual aids in an electronic medium to be projected on the classroom screen, please bring them on a thumb drive. As we get closer, the randomly-assigned order of presentations will be determined. This is a formal presentation and you are expected to come prepared. Ideas for presentation aids: • Map • Photographs • Short film clip • Timeline • Handout • PowerPoint or Prezi • Poster Tips on presenting: • Practice first to avoid umm-ing and aah-ing. Use notes to keep yourself on track as you speak extemporaneously. • Try to be clear and easy to understand (the audience can’t go back and read a section, so they need to understand from hearing). Project your voice. • Be prepared to answer questions afterward. • Do not read from slides; just use them to highlight what you are saying. Keep material on slides brief. Design choices for slides should make information easy to understand. Do not display something small from the front of the room: your audience won’t be able to see/read it. • Use transitions and connective or signpost language to guide your audience through. Consider how you can use questions to guide the listener. • Use your thesis/introduction to preview what will be covered in the presentation.
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ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
1
Annotated Bibliography on the Wellbeing of Soccer Players after Retirement
Bailey, M. (2014, Aug. 15). What do footballers do when they retire? The Telegraph. Retrieved
from https://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/active/11028666/What-do-footballers-do-when-theyretire.html.
According to the article, the wealth and optimism that is associated with professional
soccer can turn into disillusionment and bankruptcy after retirement. The staggering cash-soaked
opulence of the English Premier League has created fallacious myths about the plight of soccer
stars upon retirement. Bailey claims that even though some retired soccer stars enjoy their
retirements due to their high wages, others struggle upon hanging up their boots. The short span
of football careers as the average retirement age is 35 years makes it impossible for the players to
make savings that can sustain their lives upon retirement. The views expressed in the article
provide crucial details about the life of soccer players after retirement.
Gibson, O. (2013, Aug. 19). The hidden crisis of mental health among footballers. The
Guardian, Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/football/2013/aug/05/mental-healthfootballers-alcoholism-retirement.
According to the article, three in five of retired footballers are declared bankrupt. The
article further claims that at least 150 former players are in prison. Moreover, the chairman of the
Professional Footballer’s Association, Clarke Carlisle claims that hundreds of current players
experience mental health challenges. These incidents suggest that professional soccer players
face numerous challenges upon retirement as they lose their sources of income while the mental
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
2
issues they faced during their playing days are not addressed. Thus, the article provides crucial
insights into the plight of footballers upon retire.
Gupta, R. (2013). Riches to Rags: Millionaire footballers who lose everything. BBC Sport.
Retrieved from https://www.bbc.com/sport/football/21790728.
The article begins with the story of Lee Hendrie who rose to stardom in the late 1990s
and was considered one of the best young English soccer players. His stardom was, however,
behind him by the age of 35. He faced spiraling debts in January 2012 and repossessions after he
had attempted suicide twice. Hendrie’s story is similar to many other narratives that involve
former soccer players who went bankrupt after retirement despite earning high salaries during
their peak years. These incidents support the view that soccer successful soccer players
experience many challenges upon retirement.
Lynch, M. (2015, Apr. 22). Money worries, mental and physical problems haunt many retired
soccer players. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved from
https://www.smh.com.au/sport/soccer/money-worries-mental-and-physical-problems-hauntmany-retired-soccer-players-20150422-1mqrhj.html.
According to the article, nearly one in five of soccer players in Australia claim that their
sporting career negatively affected their financial position, while 20% admit to experiencing
mental challenges upon retirement. The survey conducted by the Professional Footballers
Association revealed that many of the soccer players struggle to sustain their finical needs while
others experience marital issues after retiring. The revelations of the article indicate that soccer
players experience numerous challenges after quitting the sports. As a result, it offers vital
insights into the plight of former professional soccer players.
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
3
Tassell, N. (2015, Apr. 24). They think it’s all over: ex-footballers on life after the final whistle.
The Guardian. Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/football/2015/apr/24/they-think-itsall-over-ex-footballers-life-after-final-whistle-premier-league.
The article contains sentiments aired by former English soccer players about their lives
when they retired. One of the interviewees, Stuart Ripley, says that he was forced to continue his
studies after quitting professional soccer at the age of 34. Other former players, such as Mark
Ward and David Hillier, were also forced to look for new jobs to sustain their financial needs.
For example, David Hillier was forced to become a firefighter despite having had a successful
career with Arsenal Football club. These narratives indicate professional footballers are forced to
adjust their lives upon retirement as the fame and money suddenly comes to an end.
Wills, N. (2017, Jul.27). Retiring from football is traumatic for the pros- but it’s even worse for
us amateurs. The Guardian. Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/football/whensaturday-comes-blog/2017/jul/27/retiring-football-traumatic-professionals-amateurs.
According to Wills in the article, Sunday League players are not offered second careers
in professional soccer in management or media roles. For this reason, they have to look for other
jobs when they retire. The article claims that football players experience psychological trauma
when they retire. For amateur players they begin to wonder what they should do with Saturdays
and Sundays when they are not at work. For former professional soccer, the glamour that they
were used to suddenly comes to an end and no one cares about what they do. Wills sentiments
indicate that having a successful soccer career puts an individual in greater danger of
experiencing mental issues upon retirement.
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
4
References
Bailey, M. (2014, Aug. 15). What do footballers do when they retire? The Telegraph. Retrieved
from https://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/active/11028666/What-do-footballers-do-whenthey-retire.html
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
5
Gibson, O. (2013, Aug. 19). The hidden crisis of mental health among footballers. The
Guardian, Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/football/2013/aug/05/mentalhealth-footballers-alcoholism-retirement.
Gupta, R. (2013). Riches to Rags: Millionaire footballers who lose everything. BBC Sport.
Retrieved from https://www.bbc.com/sport/football/21790728.
Lynch, M. (2015, Apr. 22). Money worries, mental and physical problems haunt many retired
soccer players. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved from
https://www.smh.com.au/sport/soccer/money-worries-mental-and-physical-problemshaunt-many-retired-soccer-players-20150422-1mqrhj.html.
Tassell, N. (2015, Apr. 24). They think it’s all over: ex-footballers on life after the final whistle.
The Guardian. Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/football/2015/apr/24/theythink-its-all-over-ex-footballers-life-after-final-whistle-premier-league.
Wills, N. (2017, Jul.27). Retiring from football is traumatic for the pros- but it’s even worse for
us amateurs. The Guardian. Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/football/whensaturday-comes-blog/2017/jul/27/retiring-football-traumatic-professionals-amateurs.
Running head: SOCCER PLAYERS AND RETIREMENT
1
Soccer Players and Retirement
.
Playing professional soccer is the dream of many young men across the globe whom due
to this sport speak the same language. From a fan’s perspective life during and after a sports
career is the best thing that can happen to any individual on the planet. Worryingly so, it is clear
SOCCER PLAYERS AND RETIREMENT
2
that such admirers have extended the least effort in performing extensive research on the myths
surrounding sports careers most notably soccer. From the onset of my research on the matter of
professional footballer’s life after retirement, every article or material appears to bust my bubble
from the illusion the world harbours ignorantly. Quite unlike the popular belief, most soccer
players do not retire into luxurious lives. The paper is a precise dissection of the underbelly of
life after the retirement of the soccer players, putting facts together from previous researches
consequently putting off myths and misconceptions surrounding the most admired game. Do
football players die twice?
The outside world’s perception of life after soccer is almost always a hangover of the
view presented by the media on luxurious life’s by soccer players during their playing career.
Late mornings, breakfast in bed from exotic servants, afternoon shopping, exchanging Porsche
cars throughout the day reflects the imagination of fan on life after retirement from playing
football. According to Mark Bailey, the staggering, cash-soaked opulence of the premier league
has helped to create such ridiculously gaudy myths and fallacious fantasies about the private
lives of professional footballers (Bailey, 2014). Mark argues that only for some stellar names is
this illusion not too far from their reality. Tragically, stellar names in football cannot make up
for more than a third of the professional soccer community and even so how amazingly electric
fans move on from their influence after retirement is unthinkable.
Moreover, footballing life consumes so much time that a player requires not only
professional advice but also proper managers to satisfy the varied needs of a personal life
outside the pitch. Well, more often than not players fall into the wrong set of hands which they
won’t notice until it’s a little bit too late. By some estimates as many as three in five former
footballers will be declared bankrupt, often blighted by bad financial advice (Gibson, 2013).
SOCCER PLAYERS AND RETIREMENT
3
Clack Carlisle, Chairman of the Professional Footballer Association, believes hundreds of
current players face mental health issues while more than 700 a year end up being pitched out of
the sport in their 20’s after failing to win a new contract (Gibson, 2013). How prepared are
football players for such uncertainties? Many football players know so little of the outside world
that surviving after the career is a threat.
Of course, shining lights on the life of former players give direction on what life truly is
after retirement. Lee Hendrie earning 30,000 pounds per week playing for Aston Villa and
considered among the best young English player in the late 1990’s is now 35 and the days of
luxury are well beyond him (Gupta, 2013). In the same generation as the footballing greats like
Frank Lampard and Rio Ferdinand, Hendrie faced with spiralling debts tried to take his own life
twice (Gupta, 2013). Despite the evident struggles, Hendrie followed his father’s direction of
investing wisely and had amassed property worth ten million pounds, which He all lost by 2010
(Gupta, 2013). Hendrie laments that if He was to say that He wasted money gambling or that He
didn’t just care that wouldn’t be true (Gupta, 2013). Unpopular opinion: not all former soccer
player run into difficulties due to money wastage.
On the brighter side, XPRO a welfare organization was set up to support former
professional footballers on medical afflictions or searching for employment. Although that has
not been an easy task since the legal challenge posed is great, and the demand is too high
proving a blow to XPRO’s work (Martin, 2015). “We are representing 40 players, many are
divorced, houses are being repossessed, some guys have gone bankrupt already, and we know
of 20 facing bankruptcy or an individual voluntary arrangement principally because of tax
demands” Geoff Scott XPRO’S chief executive (Martin, 2015). Therefore, it is still harder for
SOCCER PLAYERS AND RETIREMENT
4
players who have come forwards seeking management after retirement to be absolved of the
retirement voodoo.
With this in mind, numbers do not lie, and the rise of such cases are on a high in recent
times. Nearly one in Five Australian soccer players say their sporting career has hurt their
financial position, while almost 20 per cent admit they have had mental health or wellbeing
issues after they retired (Lynch, 2015). Additionally, nearly half (45 per cent) say the transition
from playing to retirement has been difficult or very difficult, while one in six is struggling
physically after having had five or more surgeries during their playing careers (Lynch, 2015).
The image of glamorous gilded lives is real for those who make it to the big European leagues.
Even for them lack of education or any qualifications counts against them, making their
transition to a post-sporting career extremely difficult (Lynch, 2015).
Furthermore, a clear analysis of the outside football world not only shows that individuals
know so little about post-soccer career but also barely care about the well-being of soccer
players after retirement. As Neill Wills unearths, the plight of a professional footballer on being
put out to grass is well documented but no one seems to care about the psychological trauma
retirement can have upon players when the referee blows that most final of final whistles (Wills,
2017). Soccer players have to face the grisly prospect of retirement alone. So while the impact
of psychological issues is felt by amateurs, the greatest extent is to the greats of the sport.
Owing to these circumstances, they either ensure their name remains up in lights or like former
Chelsea goalkeeper Petar Borota; they get themselves implicated in some stolen painting scam
resulting in lashings of intoxicating courtroom drama ( Wills, 2017).
SOCCER PLAYERS AND RETIREMENT
5
As a result, it is evident that afterlife on the pitch things are more likely to spiral out of
hand. It is no wonder due to the going concern; retired respondents urge players to spend more
time developing and working on an alternative career pathway should football finish sooner
than they hope (Lynch, 2015). Sadly, the options remaining in the game do not tempt a retired
footballer as it may only provide morbid nostalgia of watching young former teammates strut
their stuff (Wills, 2015). Premiere league sides are so picky these days meaning landing a
managerial job is not easy (Wills, 2015). That difficulty in career paths to follow after football
is a slippery one and is reflective of the post-soccer life in the top five Europeans leagues. Will
questions, where do we go after an illustrious career in the famed toughest league in the world?
(Wills, 2015). Nowhere.
In light of this it o imperative to give a fans dimension on the whole matter. Firstly, it is
clear that the choices of a footballer during a playing career are very crucial. In spite of that, a
soccer player has minimal control over the happenings after moving on from the pitch as it is
almost certain damnation. Players have so little knowledge of the real world due to poor
educational background or experience thereof that means they have to place their fate in the
hands of personal managers without their interest at heart. In the end, even after making the socalled good decisions their life during an active career appears to set the bar so high that it is
expensive to maintain during retirement.
On the whole, the world offers so little to footballing players after their playing careers. It
is imperative that their employers provide an alternative in the form of educational training to
indulge the soccer players into the real world. To be brutally honest, the world itself is doing so
little to support soccer players upon retirement. To blame their misfortune on their extravagant
lifestyles is ignorant. Due to the rising cases of mismanagement, there is an apparent need for
SOCCER PLAYERS AND RETIREMENT
6
the concerned bodies to come up with ways to mitigate the damnation that is retirement for
football players. The world needs to increase awareness on the psychological issues surrounding
the sports afterlife in a bid to suppress myths and misconceptions about the big game. Surely,
soccer is a virtual world that separates the players from the real world which harbour the tale of
a luxurious post-soccer life. More needs to be done to mitigate this growing concern, more!!
References
SOCCER PLAYERS AND RETIREMENT
7
Bailey, M. (2014, Aug. 15). What do footballers do when they retire? The Telegraph. Retrieved
from https://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/active/11028666/What-do-footballers-do-whenthey-retire.html.
Gibson, O. (2013, Aug. 19). The hidden crisis of mental health among footballers. The
Guardian, Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/football/2013/aug/05/mentalhealth-footballers-alcoholism-retirement.
Gupta, R. (2013). Riches to Rags: Millionaire footballers who lose everything. BBC Sport.
Retrieved from https://www.bbc.com/sport/football/21790728
Lynch, M. (2015, Apr. 22). Money worries, mental and physical problems haunt many retired
soccer players. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved from
https://www.smh.com.au/sport/soccer/money-worries-mental-and-physical-problemshaunt-many-retired-soccer-players-20150422-1mqrhj.html.
Martin, A. (2015). Premier League footballers struggle with life after retirement. Retrieved from
https://www.givemesport.com/541191-premier-league-footballers-struggle-with-lifeafter-retirement
Wills, N. (2017, Jul.27). Retiring from football is traumatic for the pros- but it’s even worse for
us amateurs. The Guardian. Retrieved from
https://www.theguardian.com/football/when-saturday-comes-blog/2017/jul/27/retiringfootball-traumatic-professionals-amateurs

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