Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Key Performance Indicators in Alliances Assignment | Abc Paper
+1(978)310-4246 credencewriters@gmail.com
  

After an initial agreement has been reached, it is not unusual for partnerships to experience difficulties. Issues that seemed simple going into an alliance often become more complicated at the implementation stage. One partner may have expectations of the other that were not clearly spelled out to the satisfaction of each. Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) can create initial consensus, but Service Level Agreements (SLAs) in manufacturing and the service industry have set higher expectations and outcomes, and even more specific expectations with Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) used for assessing actual performance. KPIs are an important means of measuring specifically targeted areas of performance that, if achieved, will help ensure that the organization fulfills its operational and strategic goals, thus helping to monitor the success of the agreements between the alliance partners. Early in the process of negotiating KPIs with vendors, there is often a failure to get key stakeholders, such as HR, legal, internal IT, and the vendor, all together to agree on the KPI content. Using the Laurent (2008) article, “Human Resources and Recruiting Management,” to provide context, specify the causes of such failures and consider what the HR department can do to remedy these situations. Consider recommended practices in developing key performance indicators. To complete this Assignment, respond to the following in a 3- to 4-page paper: Evaluate the importance of negotiating key performance indicators with alliance partners. Why are KPIs crucial to the success of alliance agreements? Describe how KPIs alleviate potential problems with alliance partners. From your research on negotiating KPIs, what types of barriers to agreements often get in the way? How can such barriers be removed or avoided? Analyze the effects of foundation accords, governance accords, and change accords on the success of a strategic alliance. How should the organization’s overall strategy drive the accords? What are the potential risks and benefits associated with each type of accord on the success strategic alliances? Which type of accord do you consider most important for the long-term success of the strategic alliance? Why? All work must be original and in APA format. Resources are attached for your reference.
human_resources_and_recruiting_management.pdf

maximizing_human_capital_demonstrating_hr_value_with_key_performance_indicators.pdf

trust_and_collaboration_in_the_aftermath_of_conflict_the_effects_of_contract_structure.pdf

understanding_the_benefits_and_challenges_of_strategic_alliances.pdf

why_too_much_trust_is_death_to_innovation.pdf

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Human Resources and Recruiting Management
Laurent, William . DM Review ; New York Vol. 18, Iss. 6, (Jun 2008): 15.
ProQuest document link
ABSTRACT (ABSTRACT)
In order to effectively manage vendors and have them become true partners in the business, they must be held
accountable. This can only be accomplished by using performance metrics that help both parties actively track
and communicate issues in a timely manner. Without vendor key performance indicators (KPIs), there can be no
measurement and thus no improvement. Businesses need to remember that vendor lists are dynamic and subject
to change. Data should be accessible and help managers understand what vendors have filled which requisitions,
what the vendor’s commission fee was and more. The value of having this sort of actionable knowledge is rousing;
in fact, the ROI on this data can be immediately realized by using it to great advantage in the vendor-fee
negotiating process. Just as sales and marketing departments are always held accountable for their achievement
via standard qualitative and quantitative KPIs, so should an organization’s vendors. According to Jason de Luca,
senior managing partner of Smart Partners, a Tokyo-based boutique consultancy, “Organizations are realizing that
initial enterprise resource planning projects have fallen short in terms of what is offered in the HR space. Some of
the more common performance metrics that have been used internally need to be extended to vendors if they are
to add requisite value to the business.” Many recruiters talk about how they add value, but few companies know if
they really are adding value because they don’t know how to measure value externally; in fact, they are probably
having quite a few problems measuring it internally.
FULL TEXT
Ask any employer, and he or she most likely agrees with the ancient axiom “Good people are difficult to find.” More
than ever, global enterprises face an unprecedented degree of competition in recruiting and hiring the best
candidates and talent at all levels of seniority. Ironically, while the hiring and retention of quality personnel is
critical to the growth and survival of 21st century companies, the business processes and IT systems that support
procurement and development of employees are often ill conceived, poorly managed and devoid of value.
All too often, corporate HR offices lose control of the hiring process without being aware of it. Despite the
establishment of an entrenched vendor list, senior and junior managers from all business segments will have their
own preferred vendors, creating unlimited potential for conflicts of interest and complicating the candidate search,
recruitment and interview processes for the organization. In large labor markets such as London, New York, Hong
Kong and Tokyo – where thousands of recruitment and executive search agencies exist – the problem can be
compounded exponentially. And while many large organizations have robust customer relationship management
implementations that address and streamline various vendor management processes, there is inevitably a lack of
actionable data captured and maintained by these systems that will help recruitment firms and retained search
firms add maximum value to the hiring process lifecycle and become better business partners.
In order to effectively manage vendors and have them become true partners in the business, they must be held
accountable. This can only be accomplished by using performance metrics that help both parties actively track
and communicate issues in a timely manner. Without vendor key performance indicators (KPIs), there can be no
measurement and thus no improvement. Businesses need to remember that vendor lists are dynamic and subject
to change. Data should be accessible and help managers understand what vendors have filled which requisitions,
what the vendor’s commission fee was and more. The value of having this sort of actionable knowledge is rousing;
in fact, the ROI on this data can be immediately realized by using it to great advantage in the vendor-fee
PDF GENERATED BY SEARCH.PROQUEST.COM
Page 1 of 3
negotiating process. Just as sales and marketing departments are always held accountable for their achievement
via standard qualitative and quantitative KPIs, so should an organization’s vendors. According to Jason de Luca,
senior managing partner of Smart Partners, a Tokyo-based boutique consultancy, “Organizations are realizing that
initial enterprise resource planning projects have fallen short in terms of what is offered in the HR space. Some of
the more common performance metrics that have been used internally need to be extended to vendors if they are
to add requisite value to the business.” Many recruiters talk about how they add value, but few companies know if
they really are adding value because they don’t know how to measure value externally; in fact, they are probably
having quite a few problems measuring it internally.
In addition to performance metrics for better vendor accountability, another common problem is the monumental
proliferation of candidates’ personal information, usually in the form of resumes. Resumes contain a virtual
treasure trove of confidential information – a combination of personal and professional facts that expose both the
potential employee and the corporation to unlimited risks. Far too often, a centralized repository or application to
securely store and manage this sort of information does not exist. Resumes freely get sent in email attachments
all around the organization and between the organization and its recruiting firms. Such practices could spell
disaster for all parties, and regulatory mandates that aim to protect their citizens’ personal information are starting
to get tougher. Institutions across the world must now balance the wealth of opportunities afforded to them by
their data assets with the risk that these data assets may be compromised by numerous threats both internally
and externally. Loosely structured data that resides on candidate resumes is no exception.
Getting a handle on how the hiring function of the organization is running will always be a critical component of
fully understanding how the business is running as a whole. However, employee hiring processes don’t usually get
the same amount of attention that is given to more strategic customer-facing tasks or operational and sales
processes. Vendor management issues are commonly not transparent and thus do not surface as obvious
candidates for business process reengineering, governance, best practices or system enhancement. However,
modern times necessitate that HR offices adopt and foster a more proactive agenda in order to leapfrog
competitors in retaining and hiring staff. Likewise, executive search firms, headhunters and recruiters of all stripes
will find themselves having to add measurable value to the recruiting functions of their clients. Enterprises must
do a better job working with their vendors to iteratively re-engineer recruiting processes while mutually managing
any associated risks.
A company’s most valuable assets are its people. Fortune 500 companies allocate more than one-third of their
operating revenue – in remuneration, health care, retirement/pension funds, training and additional programs – on
human capital. Prudent corporations don’t neglect to extend governance and technology best practices to the
procurement of human capital.
William Laurent is a renowned independent consultant in data, governance and IT strategy. Please contact him at
wlaurent@williamlaurent.com.
(c) 2008 DM Review and SourceMedia, Inc. All Rights Reserved. http://www.dmreview.com
http://www.sourcemedia.com
DETAILS
Publication title:
DM Review; New York
Volume:
18
Issue:
6
First page:
15
PDF GENERATED BY SEARCH.PROQUEST.COM
Page 2 of 3
Publication year:
2008
Publication date:
Jun 2008
Section:
Corporate Governance
Publisher:
SourceMedia
Place of publication:
New York
Country of publication:
United States, New York
Publication subject:
Computers–Data Base Management
ISSN:
15212912
Source type:
Scholarly Journals
Language of publication:
English
Document type:
News
ProQuest document ID:
214669761
Document URL:
https://ezp.waldenulibrary.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/214
669761?accountid=14872
Copyright:
(Copyright c 2008 SourceMedia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.)
Last updated:
2011-09-27
Database:
ProQuest Central
LINKS
Linking Service
Database copyright  2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved.
Terms and Conditions
Contact ProQuest
PDF GENERATED BY SEARCH.PROQUEST.COM
Page 3 of 3
2006 SHRM® Research Ouarteriv
O
Maximizing
Human Capitai:
Demonstrating HR Value With
Key Performance Indicators
Nancy R. Lockwood, SPHR, GPHR, M.A.
Manager, HR Content Program
o
Research
o
2006 SHRM^^’ Research Quarterly
Abstract
To drive value and optimize company performance, human capital—the collective knowledge, skills and
abilities of people that contribute to organizational success—is an asset to be leveraged. Based on corporate culture, organizational values and strategic business goals and objectives, human capital measures
indicate the health of the organization. The effective use of key performance indicators (KPIs) that measure human capital outcomes, such as talent management, employee engagement and high performance,
illustrates the firm’s business, financial and strategic goals, promotes partnership with senior management for organizational success and demonstrates HR value to the C-suite.
Introduction
“In order to fully value human capital, we must go
beyond the view of human effort as purely individual.
We, humans, affect each other profoundly, and it is the
way we affect each other that determines our value
to our organizations. And. it is the way that strategic
human resource professionals bring this understanding to the fore of their organizations that determines
HR’s vaiue at the senior management tabie.”^
In 1995. the seminal study by management guru
Mark Huselid linked high-performance work practices with company performance and revealed that
workforce practices had an economic effect on
employee outcomes such as turnover and productivity, as well as on short- and long-term measures of
corporate financial performance.= This study marked
a new era of measuring the Influence of HR to promote effective organizational performance, sustainability and financial success.
As HR positions itself as a strategic business partner, one of the most effective ways to do so is to
support the strategic business goals through key
performance indicators. Key performance indicators (also known as KPIs) are defined as quantifiable, specific measures of an organization’s
performance in certain areas of its business. The
purpose of KPIs is to provide the company with
quantifiable measurements of what is determined
to be important to the organization’s critical success factors and long-term business goals. Once
uncovered and properly analyzed, KPIs can be
used to understand and improve organizational
performance and overall success.^
Why Measure Human Capital?
The primary motivation to measure human capital
is to improve the bottom line. To design better
KPIs. it is essential for HR to understand what is
important to the business and what key business
measures exist. In addition, the drive to measure human capital reflects the change of role of
human resources from administrative to that of a
strategic business partner. In general, human capital measurement is a measure of effective human
resource management.
Broadly stated. HR metrics measure efficiency
(time and cost) and the effectiveness of certain
activities. Yet mastering human capital measures
Maximizing Human Capital
can be a very complex undertaking. Today. HR professionals are expanding the “traditional” metrics,
such as head count, time-to-fill and turnover, to
KPIs that align with corporate objectives and create greater stakeholder value. However, KPIs often
demand large amounts of data and technological
support. In addition, the triai-and-error required to
set appropriate and meaningful measures comes
into play, as well as patience and education of
those involved. Yet despite these challenges, 84%
of companies expect to increase the application of
human capital measures in the next few years.^
With a clear line of sight on workforce and organizational performance, effective use of KPIs also
illustrates HR’s in-depth understanding of the links
to business success. KPIs help build the credibility
of the HR department, demonstrate HR value and
foster respect and partnership with senior management and the C-suite. For example, when an HR
professional not only shows that a new recruiting
program resulted in a lower time to fill positions
in the organization, but can also demonstrate that
the program yielded an additional amount of revenue because billable staff were able to start at
client sites more quickly, he or she builds HR credibility. Credibility is increased because HR is able
to link HR activities to firm performance and communicate it in financial/business terms. Additional
critical reasons to measure human capital include
steering human capital resource allocation, winning business cases for human capital investment,
tracking human capital activities to develop human
capital predictions, linking variable compensation
to human capital best practices, delivering human
capital information required by law and providing
investors with information on human capital performance. Some firms even use KPIs to enhance
their company image as a progressive employer of
choice.^
Further, with many HR functions increasingly being
outsourced, credibility is earned through activities and outcomes that result in “deliverables”
that promote and lead to organizational success.’^
Consequently, it is important to select KPIs that are
most meaningful to the organization. For example,
logical KPIs to select are those that reflect drivers
for human capital measurement, such as financial
outcome measures (e.g., revenue growth and cost
reduction) and performance drivers (e.g., customer
2 0 0 6 SHR^’^’T
satisfaction, process technology innovation, product
technology innovation, globalization). Within that
framework, the most common categories of people
measures include turnover, productivity (revenue,
profit per employee), employee satisfaction/employee engagement, recruitment, diversity, remuneration, competencies/training, leadership, and health
and safety. Most frequently measured are turnover,
voluntary resignation, average compensation, average workforce age, diversity and compensation/
total cost. Such KPIs will help HR professionals
predict what they need to know to act in a timely
and effective manner and identify ideas and areas
where HR can develop new initiatives, or revisit others, to obtain stronger results.^ Clearly, KPIs are the
wave of the future for HR.
Culture, Stakeholders and KPIs
As the saying goes, “what gets measured gets managed.” The company culture and corresponding values define what is measured. Therefore, when HR
considers important KPIs, the first place to look is
at corporate culture and what is most valued within
that culture. In addition, stakeholders (both internal
and external) go hand-in-hand with company culture.
A stakeholder is an individual or entity with a stake
in how the organization performs and/or conducts
itself. Internal stakeholders are employees, line
managers, senior management, C-suite and the
board of directors. External stakeholders include
shareholders, customers, vendors, the community
and the government.
Figure 1
HR Value-Added
Strategic Activities
• Help identify or design strategy options.
• Help decide among the best strategy options.
• Help plan the implementation of a strategy.
• Help design the criteria for strategic success.
• Help identify new business opportunities.
• Assess the organization’s readiness to
implement strategies.
• Help design the organizational structure to
implement a strategy.
• Assess possible merger, acquisition or divestiture strategies.
• Work with the corporate board on business
strategy.
• Recruit and develop talent.
^^^
Source: Adapted from Lawler III, E. £.. Boudreau. J. W.. & Mohrman. S.
A. (2006). Achieving strategic excellence; An assessment of human
resource organizations. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press.
earch Quarter^’
Working closely with internal stakeholders is beneficial for HR to 1) prioritize capabilities and create
action plans to deliver them; 2) focus on deliverables rather than doables; 3) build relationships
of trust; and 4) help resolve misconceptions of
HR.8 Different stakeholders have different criteria.
The key priority is to give business partners the
information they need to manage the company.
For example, senior management values performance measures that predict and lead to future
organizational financial success and sustainability.
On the other hand, while one employee considers the availability of upward career mobility very
important, another employee stays for health care
benefits. As a result, training to promote opportunities to move up in the organization and informational sessions about employee benefits packages
may be important. Cverall, most important are
KPIs that track key business indicators of human
capital issues. HR must focus on KPIs that best
illustrate stakeholder values that will lead to organizational success.
KPIs—A Strategic Management Tool
To think strategically about measurement and how
best to use KPIs as a strategic management tool,
it is essential to understand the meaning of the
measurements and their purpose. This approach
will not only be beneficial to help better manage
the HR function, but also will naturally lead to
aligning HR’s goals and objectives with those of
the organization.^
According to a recent national longitudinal study
on the assessment of human resource organizations, strategy is the top high-value add for HR.
However, in only 60% of companies did the HR
executive see HR as a “full partner.” In addition,
24% of executives outside of human resources
viewed their HR counterparts as working at lower
levels of strategic involvement, compared with
40% of HR executives. The study suggests that
activities related to strategy provide the most highend impact for HR to demonstrate its value (see
Figure 1). In addition, the relationship between
business strategy activities and HR’s strategic role
points to areas where HR can contribute; growth,
the core business, quality and speed, informationbased strategies, knowledge-based strategies, and
organizational performance. The study data also
reveal key strategic HR activities that link business emphases with the organization’s strategic
focus: 1) having a data-based talent strategy; 2)
partnering with tine managers to develop business strategy; 3) providing analytic support for
business decision-making; 4) providing HR data to
support change management; 5) driving change
management; and 6) making rigorous data-based
Maximizing Human Capital
?006 SHRM”‘ Research Quartei
decisions about human capital management.^”
From these HR strategy activities, key performance
indicators can be developed.
At the same time, when determining strategic KPIs,
it is essential to consider who designs human capital measures and how they are created. Research
by The Conference Board reveals key contributors to these metrics. Overall, HR designs 94% of
human capital measures, often basing them on
measures in the company scorecard. To create
human capital measures, 77% of HR professionals
meet with company business managers. For example, finance, strategic planning, outside consulting
experts, business managers and IT contribute to
HR measurement design. However, if HR lacks
expertise with metrics, it is helpful to partner with
group …
Purchase answer to see full
attachment

error: Content is protected !!