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“You should follow the prompt. You should use all the skills you learned on researched arguments before this class. If you’d like to get credit for it, you should also demonstrate several techniques from our text They Say, I Say. Try to use at least five different ones.Additionally, try to use a little of the information we studied early in the semester about logical arguments and failure of arguments, like this web page (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..”-teacherThat was my teachers instructions I will provide a sample paper and the prompt.
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Argumentative Research Paper
Write a paper arguing a currently controversial subject that won’t make my head explode. Anything in or
around the topics in our book is fine. Most topics are fine.
That said, I know enough about the following things (& I know how prevalent poor evidence is for them),
that I would recommend against writing on the topics of atheism, gun control, or abortion. Even if I
entirely agree with your position, I will probably hate your argument.
Use the logic handout. Use all the advice on writing in They Say, I Say. Use what you learn from analyzing
and discussing the readings in class. All of your assigned papers are designed to show me what you’ve
learned from the texts and in class. If they don’t demonstrate that (or if they demonstrate you’re not
learning much), they won’t pass.
My suggestions for a successful paper (not required, but if you don’t have a better idea, this should
work)…
1. Start with a hook: a quote, surprising statistic, moving anecdote or something similar and on
topic that grabs the reader’s attention. In the same paragraph or the next, provide some general
context, a thesis statement, and a plan of development (where you briefly outline your
argument).
2. In the body of the paper, make smaller assertions that support your larger assertion, and
provide evidence in the form of specific facts, statistics, expert opinion and examples from
reputable sources to support those assertions. Use reasoning/logic to help the reader connect
evidence to arguments. Consider beginning the body of the paper with some recent history on
the issue, and moving towards what you think should be done.
3. Use transitions to help the reader understand how one sub-argument connects to another and
how they all support the main argument.
4. Don’t forget to include one or more counterarguments: likely objections to your argument
which you will then do your best to argue against.
5. In your conclusion, if you must restate your thesis, try to vary the wording a bit, and also include
a call to action: something (not to painful, expensive or time consuming) your reader can do to
help.
At least five reputable sources, all used, and all in the Work’s Cited page.
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Pearlisita Dungog
November 5, 2018
Stafford
English 124
Learning Music Is Priceless
When I was in the fifth grade, my school, Audubon Elementary, had the opportunity to
have a music program for us students to participate in. They offered ensembles such as an
uplifting children’s choir, an exhilarating concert band, and a string orchestra full of violin
virtuosos. I fell in love with music when this moment happened; So, I picked up an instrument
and a tuner and played in all of them! The ensembles I’ve participated in would let us travel all
around San Diego. We would perform at the famous Copley Symphony Hall in downtown,
ornate churches in Pointe Loma, Sing the national anthem at Petco Park before a baseball game,
promote ourselves on television, and even field trips to music festivals at Disneyland in
Anaheim. Over the years, unfortunate events begin to unravel. First, the music classes started to
cut down times of the rehearsals until there was no time for music. Instead, students ended up
focusing more on studying tests and learning main subjects like math and english. Then, my
classmates and I had to say farewell to our dedicated music teachers since the school didn’t have
the reason to now that the music classes were reduced. At that point, I understood my school
couldn’t fund the music program. As time went by, I witnessed the music rooms become dusty
and run-down; The string and band instruments appeared out of tune and dilapidated as well. But
that didn’t discourage me to refrain from music. As I grew up, I kept motivating myself to
practice music despite the financial struggles in my high school and college years. In a social
sense, my parents disagreed with my creative passions because they believed the performing arts
seems “unimportant” or “in the way of school”. I didn’t believe in such an idea from them, but
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this childhood memory inspired me and decided to become a music education major so I could
fight against these financial troubles and teach others the true value of music.
The decline in music education in schools is a definite mistake. All students ranging from
elementary school to college needs these windows to express creativity, to grow mentally, to be
successful physically, and to learn important life lessons like being a leader. Many people, like
my parents, had a fixed mindset sought music as a useless subject for us youth that consequently
does not benefit future generations.
One reason to care about music education in schools is that it develops the student’s
mind, body and soul. Students can learn music in their daily lives just as the same time as
learning the alphabet and counting numbers; music does connect the elements of math and
english with it. Certain examples you’d learn would be how to solve problems like in sightreading (it’s when you play a piece for the first time reading the sheet music), learn languages
like understanding Italian phrases when reading sheet music like pizzicato meaning “to pluck” or
moderato meaning “moderate”, and mathematical concepts of chords and scale degrees in music
theory. (it’s not like you’re learning rocket science.)
Susan Hallam, Senior Lecturer in Computing at Nottingham Trent University and a
speaker and practicing consultant, states scientific confirmation how music affects a human’s
brain. She states, “Learning to play an instrument enhances the ability to remember words
through enlargement of the left cranial temporal regions. Musically trained participants
remembered 17% more verbal information that those without musical training.” knowing this, I
agree that Hallam elucidates to skeptics of the extent of what’s happening inside in our minds.
Could you use a school subject to describe a feeling? Math nor english couldn’t convey
in equations or words like music can. Music actually allows us profess specific feelings of
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passion and attainment when you play. Adding to the idea, “participating in an ensemble
enhanced feelings of self-achievement for the study’s participants, assisted individuals in
overcoming challenges, built self-confidence, and raised determination to make more effort to
meet group expectations regarding standards of playing” (Hallam, 12.) Throughout our whole
lives, we have the ability to express interpretation, determination, and the sense of liberty in such
ensembles.
Music connects to all life necessities: having any awards and leadership achievements
built in your resume gets you a better career lifestyle, a charismatic social life when conversing
taste of music with friends, and much more when you start off young. According to Kenneth K.
Guilmartin, cofounder of Music Together, a music development program for young children that
includes parent or caregiver involvement in classes, says, “Making music involves more than the
voice or fingers playing an instrument; a child learning about music has to tap into multiple skill
sets, often simultaneously. For instance, people use their ears and eyes, as well as large and small
muscles.” Guilmartin has the right idea with the results of a child learning music. Therefore,
children can actually have a growth mindset with their skills when learning music is involved.
To further explain the impact music benefits people, Judson Ellen, a marketer for 20
years in both on the client and agency side, did market research and wrote materials for public
relations and correlate social and academic manners with music education, provides statistical
evidence that music also helps children build character and higher thinking skills that only music
can build. she states,
“…Positive results have been noted in standardized tests. Regardless of socioeconomic
background, according to a 10-year study that tracked more than 25,000 middle and high school
students, music-making students get higher marks on standardized tests than those who have
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little or no music involvement. The College Entrance Examination Board found that students in
music programs scored 63 points higher on the verbal and 44 points higher on the math sections
of the SATs than students with no music participation. Additionally, students performed better
on other standardized tests such as reading proficiency exams.”
With this study, music proves that it can exert more ability in testing. It could be as well
encouraged to have school districts understand this effect and could soon input the idea to
implement more musical methods to aid their efforts in testing. It would be a win-win on both
sides if schools wants students to be successful in the main subjects.
To ease the worries of any financial flaws or assumptions when running music programs,
According to NAMM music, not-for-profit association that promotes the pleasures and benefits
of making music, advocate and donor in music education, and a $17 billion global music product
industry, states information,
“Fermanich’s study focused on a school district, which served over 70,000 students
during the 2009-2010 school year. The district includes urban, suburban and rural schools with a
total district budget of $853 million. From that $13.9 million was allocated to music education
representing 1.6% percent of total district expenditures. The sample school district is moderately
diverse with 25% minority students and 25% of the student population designated eligible for
Title 1 funds available for low-income families.”
As a result, the stigma of thinking that music education is “expensive” or “money-wastein-funds” is proved to be uncredible. Henceforth, this could be an opportunity for education
boards to reconsider the financial management in the programs.
As of learning the the facts, music is completely underestimated by school districts that it
is a vital impact to students’ education. Being aware that music affects physically, emotionally,
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and mentally to us individuals, music resulted in a lifetime benefit of enhanced abilities in multitask performances and cognitive strategies. The school districts should reconsider and reallocate
the funds into music programs and continue with a growth mindset of music as an equal like any
other school subject. When this comes to effect, it can our youth’s futures more secure. Without
the efforts to save music, we would set ourselves back into an imbalance between creativity and
intellectual growth thus hindering such human capabilities.
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Works Cited
Guilmartin, Kenneth K., and Lili M. Levinowitz. “Millions Singing Since 1987.” Music
Together, www.musictogether.com/about/history.
Hallam, Susan. “The power of music: its impact on the intellectual, social and personal
development of children and young people.” International Journal of Music Education
28.3
(2010):
269-89.
Print.
Judson, Ellen. “The Importance of Music.” Music Empowers Foundation. N.p., n.d. Web.
1 Oct. 2013.
“Study First to Detail the Costs of Comprehensive Music Education.” NAMM.org, 28 Aug. 2012,
www.namm.org/news/press-releases/study-first-detail-costs-comprehensive-music.

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